September 2014 - May 2015

 

Sunday, May 31, 2015

 

~ The First Sunday after Pentecost: Trinity Sunday ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Nicaea, by Robert Buckley Farlee

Processional Hymn: Holy, holy, holy (Nicaea)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias

Psalm: Psalm 29, setting by Percy Buck

Offertory Anthem: Heilig ("Holy"), by Felix Mendelssohn

Offertory Hymn: Come almighty King (Moscow)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Laus tibi, laus Gloria, by Orlando di Lassus
Communion Hymn: Let all mortal flesh keep silence (Picardy)

Recessional Hymn: Immortal, Invisible, God only wise (St. Denio)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552, by J.S. Bach


Trinity Sunday, observed on the First Sunday after Pentecost, is filled with theological pitfalls, and is a decidedly difficult Sunday on which to preach. (For further explanation on the difficulties of explicating the Three-in-One, try out this video.) Fortunately, because music typically lacks the specific, lexical content that spoken and written language does, musicians have had less heretical pitfalls to deal with in their depiction of the Trinity--though the task is no less daunting.

Mendelssohn's setting of the familiar text sung as the Sanctus ("Holy, Holy, Holy"), is taken from today's old testament reading, in which Isaiah has a vision of angelic choirs singing. Mendelssohn sets the text for double choir, slowly emerging and evolving like light breaking through clouds, giving way to trumpets. Orlando di Lassus was a Renaissance composer and true polyglot and international cosmopolitan--his travels began at a young age when he was kidnapped as a boy chorister because his voice was so beautiful, and, later he would write macaronic letters to friends and family, using multiple languages to create hidden puns and wordplay. His setting of the Trinitarian text "To you be praise, to you be glory" is  fairly reserved, but nonetheless beautiful, as it unwinds to a final shimmering F major cadence.

Our service ends with Bach's magnificient triple fugue in E-flat major, one of the triumphs in Trinitarian musical sermons. The fugue begins with a stilo antico ("antique," or "Renaissance" style) subject--long, drawn-out notes that hint at a sense of timelessness. The first section reaches a glorious cadence, only to give way to a new fugue of rushing eighth notes, similar to the subject of last week's fugue, which utilized a special type of motive known as "Flammenzuggen," or "Tongue's of Flame" in German Baroque rhetorical study. This, in turn, introduces a third and final fugue with dancing, descending counterpoint. Magically, all three subjects become interwoven together: the timeless and ancient (Father), the rushing flame (Holy Spirit), and the one descending from above (Son).

 

Sunday, May 24, 2015


~ The Sunday of Pentecost: Whitsunday ~


Opening Voluntary: My Spirit be Joyful, by J.S. Bach

Processional Hymn: Hail thee, festival day (Salve festa dies)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias

Psalm: Psalm 104: 25-35, 37, setting by William Crotch

Offertory Anthem: Praise to the Lord, by Douglas Buchanan

Offertory Hymn: Come down, O Love divine (Down Ampney)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Loquebantur variis linguis Apostoli

Recessional Hymn: Love divine, all loves excelling (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in D Major, BWV 532, by J.S Bach

 

Sunday, May 17, 2015


~ Ascension Sunday: The Seventh Sunday in Easter ~


Opening Voluntary: Come Away to the Skies, by David Evan Thomas

Processional Hymn: Hail the day that sees him rise (Llanfair)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias

Psalm: Psalm 1, setting by Frederick Ouseley

Offertory Anthem: O Clap Your Hands, by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Offertory Hymn: When Christ was lifted from the earth (St. Botolph)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Beati quorum via, by C.V. Stanford

Communion Hymn: Draw nigh and take the body of the Lord (Song 46)

Recessional Hymn: Crown him with many crowns (Diademata)

Closing Voluntary:  All Glory be to God on High, by Nicholas Vetter


 

~ The Service of Evensong ~


Prelude Recital

Performed by S'amusant: Wade Davis, Baroque 'cello;

Patrick Merill, harpischord; Melissa Wimbish, soprano


Music for a while, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Sonata for 'Cello in G Major, by Domenico Gabrielli (1659-1690)

Pavane and Galliad, by William Byrd (c. 1540-1623)

Ich deine betrübtes Kind, from Cantata BWV 199, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Evening Hymn, by Henry Purcell


Processional Hymn: Hail the day that sees him rise (Llanfair)

Preces and Reponses: Thomas Morley (ca. 1577-1602)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light (Thomas Tallis, The Eighth Tune)

Psalm: Psalm 19, setting by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis: Evening Service, by C.V. Stanford (1852-1924)

Anthem: O Clap Your Hands, by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Recessional Hymn: All creatures of our God and Kin (Lasst uns erfreuen)

Closing Voluntary: Improvisation on Lasst uns erfreuen, by Douglas Buchanan


Sunday, May 10, 2015


~ The Sixth Sunday in Easter ~


Opening Voluntary: Improvisation on "Dona Nobis Pacem"

Processional Hymn: Awake, arise, lift up your voice (Richmond)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 22: 24-30, Setting by Edward John Hopkins (1818-1901)

Offertory Anthem: "Dona Nobis Pacem," from Messe in H-moll, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Offertory Hymn: Lord, make us servants of your peace (Dickinson College)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: O Pray for the Peace of Jerusalem, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Communion Hymn: Alleluia, alleluia! Give thanks to the risen Lord (Alleluia 1)

Recessional Hymn: I come with joy to meet my Lord (Land of Rest)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in C Major, BWV 547, by J.S. Bach

 

Sunday, May 3, 2015


~ The Fifth Sunday in Easter ~


Opening Voluntary: Improvisation on "Dona Nobis Pacem"

Processional Hymn: Awake, arise, lift up your voice (Richmond)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 22: 24-30, Setting by Edward John Hopkins (1818-1901)

Offertory Anthem: "Dona Nobis Pacem," from Messe in H-moll, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Offertory Hymn: Lord, make us servants of your peace (Dickinson College)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: O Pray for the Peace of Jerusalem, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Communion Hymn: Alleluia, alleluia! Give thanks to the risen Lord (Alleluia 1)

Recessional Hymn: I come with joy to meet my Lord (Land of Rest)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in C Major, BWV 547, by J.S. Bach

 

Sunday, April 26, 2015


~ The Fourth Sunday in Easter: Good Shepherd Sunday ~


Opening Voluntary: Pastorale, from Sonata no. 4, by Pietro Yon (1886-1943)

Processional Hymn: At the Lamb's high feast we sing (Salzburg)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 23, setting by Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Offertory Anthem: Shepherd of Souls, by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984) (World Premiere)

Offertory Hymn: The King of love my shepherd is (St. Columba)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: The Lord is My Shepherd, by Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)

Communion Hymn: Shepherd of Souls (St. Agnes)

Recessional Hymn: Savior, like a shepherd lead us (Sicilian Mariners)

Closing Voluntary:  Prelude and Fugue in D Major, by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

 

Sunday, April 19, 2015


~ The Third Sunday in Easter ~


Opening Voluntary: Now the Green Blade Riseth, by Mark Sedio (b. 1954)

Processional Hymn: He is risen, he is risen! (Unser Herrscher)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 4, Anglican Chant setting by William Knyvett (1779-1856)

Offertory Anthem: I Saw him Standing, by Tarik O'Regan (b. 1978)

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life, by William Harris (1883-1973)

Communion Hymn: Come, risen Lord, and deign to be our guest (Rosedale)

Recessional Hymn: Christ is alive! (Truro)

Closing Voluntary:  Truro, by J. Wayne Kerr (b. 1958)

 

Sunday, April 12, 2015


~ The Second Sunday in Easter ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Prière ("Prayer"), by Alexandre Guillmant (1837-1911)

Processional Hymn: That Easter day with joy was bright (Puer nobis)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 133, Anglican Chant setting by Richard Farrant (1530-1580)

Offertory Anthem: Cast Me Not Away From Thy Presence,  by S.S. Wesley (1810-1876)

Offertory Hymn: We walk by faith, and not by sight (St. Botolph)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Sing my Soul, His Wondrous Love, by Ned Rorem (b. 1923)

Communion Hymn: The strife is o'er the battle done (Victory)

Recessional Hymn: The day of resurrection (Ellacombe)

Closing Voluntary:  Fughetta, on the hymn for the First Sunday after Easter ("Quasimodo"), by Alexandre Guillmant


Sunday, April 5, 2015


~ Easter Sunday: The Sunday of the Resurrection ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Awake, thou Wintry Earth, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Hail thee, festival day! (Salve festa dies)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 118: 1-2, 14-24, Anglican Chant setting by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: "Achieved is the Glorious Work," from Creation, by F.J. Haydn (1732-1809)

Offertory Hymn: "Welcome, happy morning!" (Fortunatus)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: This Joyful Eastertide, by William Harris (1883-1973)

Communion Hymn: Good Christians all, rejoice and sing! (Gelobt sei Gott)

Recessional Hymn: Jesus Christ is risen today (Easter Hymn)

Closing Voluntary:  Toccata, from Symphony no. 5, by Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)


Saturday, April 4, 2015


~ The Great Vigil of Easter ~

 

The Exultet: Cantored by Mother Anna Noon

Psalm for the Story of Creation: Psalm 31, Sung in Plainsong

Psalm for the Story of the Flood: Psalm 46, Sung in Plainsong

Canticle for the Story of Israel's Deliverance: Canticle 8, Sung in Plainsong with Antiphon

Psalm for the Story of the Valley of Dry Bones: Psalm 30, Sung in Fauxbourdon, setting by D. Buchanan (b. 1984)

Psalm for the Gathering of God's People: Psalm 126, Anglican Chant setting by C.V. Stanford (1852-1924)

Song of Praise: Christ our Passover, "Pascha nostrum" (Sine Nomine)

Offertory Anthem: Cast Me Not Away From Thy Presence,  by S.S. Wesley (1810-1876)

Offertory Hymn: Through the Red Sea brought at last (Straf mich nicht)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Communion Anthem: O Sacred Feast by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Recessional Hymn: He is risen, he is risen! (Unser Herrscher)

Closing Voluntary: Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals, adapted by Siegfried Karg-Elert (1877-1933)


Friday, April 3, 2015


~ Good Friday ~

 

Psalm: Psalm 22: 1-11

Gospel Hymn: O sacred head, sore wounded (Herzlich tut mich verlangen)

The Passion According to John: Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

Hymn for the Veneration of the Cross: Ah, holy Jesus (Herzliebster Jesu)

The Solemn Reproaches: Tomás Luis de Victoria

Communion Anthem: God so Loved the World, by John Stainer (1840-1901)


Thursday, April 2, 2015


~ Maundy Thursday ~

 

Opening Voluntary: O Welt, ich muss dich lassen, by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Processional Hymn: Glory, love, and praise (Benifold)

Kyrie"Lord, have mercy," by Healey Willan

Psalm: Psalm 116: 1, 10-17, Sung in Plainsong

Gospel Hymn: Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love (Chereponi)
Anthem at the Footwashing: Ubi Caritas, by Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Offertory Anthem: "O Lord in Thee is all my Trust," by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)

Offertory Hymn: Thou, who at thy first Eucharist didst pray (Tune I)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Ave, Verum Corpus, by W.A. Mozart (1720-1778)

Communion Hymn: O food to pilgrims given (O Welt, ich muss dich lassen)

Closing HymnNow, my tongue, the mystery telling (Pange lingua)

Psalm at the Stripping of the Altar: Psalm 22: 1-21, sung in Plainsong


Sunday, March 29, 2015


~ Palm Sunday: The Sunday of the Passion ~

 

Psalm for the Liturgy of the Palms: Psalm 118: 1-2, 19-29 (Valet will ich dir geben)

Processional Hymn: All glory,laud and honor (Valet will ich dir geben)

Kyrie: "Lord, have mercy," by Healey Willan

Psalm: Psalm 31: 9-16

Gospel Hymn: Were you there (Were you there)

Offertory Anthem: "Domine Jesus Christe," from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Offertory Hymn: My song is love unknown (Love Unknown)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: "Libera Me," from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé

Communion Hymn: There is a green hill far away (Horsley)

(The congregation departs in silence at this service)


Sunday, March 22, 2015


~ The Fifth Sunday of Lent ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Jesu, meine Freude, J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Hail, thou once despised Jesus (In Babilone)

Kyrie"Lord, have mercy," by Healey Willan

Psalm: Psalm 119, 9-16, Sung in Plainsong, Tone VI

Offertory Anthem: "Trotz sem alter Drachen," from Jesu, meine Freude, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Hymn: O Love of God (Dunedin)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: "Weg mit allen Schätzen," from Jesu, meine Freude, by J.S. Bach

Communion Hymn: What wondrous love is this (Wondrous Love)

Recessional Hymn: Lift high the cross (Crucifer)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in E Minor, by J.S. Bach


Sunday, March 15, 2015


~ The Fourth Sunday of Lent ~


Opening Voluntary: Pavane, by Gabrielle Fauré (1845-1924)

Processional Hymn: Sing my soul, his wondrous love (St. Bees)

Kyrie: "Lord have mercy," by Healey Willan

Psalm: Psalm 107, 1-3, 17-22, Sung in Plainsong, Tone V.1

Offertory Anthem: Lord, how long wilt thou be angry, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Offertory Hymn: Amazing Grace (New Britain)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: God so Loved the World, by John Stainer (1840-1901)

Communion Hymn: My God, thy table now is spread (Rockingham)

Recessional Hymn: Guide me, O thou great Jehovah (Cwm Rhondda)

Closing Voluntary: Prelude and Fugue in E Minor, by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

  

Sunday, March 8, 2015


~ The Third Sunday of Lent ~


Opening Voluntary: Chorale Dorien, by Jehan Alain (1911-1940)

Processional Hymn: Not here for high and holy things (Morning song)

Kyrie: "Kyrie," from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Psalm: Psalm 19, Sung in Plainsong, Tone VII.3

Offertory Anthem: "Sed signifer sanctus Michael," from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé

Offertory Hymn: Rock of ages (Toplady)

Sanctus: "Sanctus," from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Agnus Dei, from Requiem, by Maurice Duruflé

Communion Hymn: Before thy throne, O God, we kneel (St. Petersburg)

Recessional Hymn: Christ is made the sure foundation (Westminster Abbey)

Closing Voluntary: Dialogue sur le trompette et le crumhorn, from Mass for the Parishes, by François Couperin (1668-1733)

 


Sunday, March 1, 2015

 

~ The Second Sunday of Lent ~


Opening Voluntary: Prelude in C Minor, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: The God of Abraham Praise (Leoni)

Kyrie: "Lord, have mercy on us," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 22:22-30, Tone IV.1

Offertory Anthem: "Es ist nun nichts," from Jesus meine Freude, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Hymn: My faith looks up to thee (Olivet)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Like as the Hart, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Communion Hymn: Take my life and let it be (Hollingside)

Recessional Hymn: Take up your cross (Bourbon)

Closing Voluntary: Fugue in C Minor, by J.S. Bach

 

Sunday, February 22, 2015

 

~ The First Sunday of Lent ~


N.B. - Services were cancelled this day

due to extreme winter weather.


Opening Voluntary: Jesu, meine Freude ("Jesus, my Joy"), by Johann G. Walther (1684-1748)

Processional Music: The Great Litany

Kyrie: "Lord, have mercy on us," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 25:1-9, Plainsong Tone I.7

Offertory Anthem: "Es ist nun nichts," from Jesus meine Freude, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Offertory Hymn: Forty days and forty nights (Aus der Tiefe rufe ich)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Like as the Hart, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Communion Hymn: Eternal Lord of love (Old 124th)

Recessional Hymn: Lord who throughout these forty days (St. Flavian)

Closing Voluntary: O Blessed Spring, by James Biery (b. 1956)


Sunday, February 15, 2015

 

~ The Last Sunday after the Epiphany ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Christe qui es lux et dies ("Christ who is the Light and Day"), J.P. Sweelinck (1562-1621)

Processional Hymn: O Wondrous Type! O Vision Fare (Wareham)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 139:1-5, 12-17, setting by Charles Hubert Hastings Parry

Offertory Anthem: Let all Mortal Flesh Keep Silence, by Edward C. Bairstow (1874-1946)

Offertory Hymn: Christ, Whose Glory Fills the Skies (Ratisbon)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: The Tabernacle of God, by William H. Harris (1883-1973)

Communion Hymn: Let all Mortal Flesh Keep Silence (Pircardy)

Recessional Hymn: Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones (Lasst uns erfreuen)

Closing Voluntary: Ricercare di Campane ("Seeking after Bells"), from Welkinharmonie, by Douglas Buchanan

 

~ The Service of Evensong ~

 

Prelude Recital: Sechs Klavierstücke, by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), performed by Ta-Wei Tsai, piano

Processional Hymn: Songs of Thankfulness and Praise (Salzburg)

Preces and Reponses: William Byrd (1540-1623)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light (Thomas Tallis, The Eighth Tune)

Psalm: Psalm 114, setting by William Crotch (1775-1847)

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis: Evening Service, by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Anthem: O Nata Lux, by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)

Recessional Hymn: Love Divine, All Loves Excelling (Hyfrodol)

Closing Voluntary: Overture e Ciacona Giubilante, from Welkinharmonie, by Douglas Buchanan

 

Sunday, February 8, 2015

 

~ The Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Partita on Jesu, meine Freude, by F.W. Zachau (1663-1712)

Processional Hymn: Father, we praise thee (Christe sanctorum)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 111, setting by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: "Ihr aber seid nicht Fleischlich," from Jesu, meine Freude by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Offertory Hymn: In Christ there is no East or West (McKee)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: O Nata Lux, by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)

 

Closing Voluntary: Cloches, by Nicholas Lebégue

While the music for Epiphany 4 focused on English composers of the Twentieth Century, most of the the music for this week comes from the Baroque era. We begin with a chorale partita--or, set of variations, or "parts"--by German Baroque composer Friedrich Wilhelm Zachau, based on the chorale tune we sing as "Jesus, Priceless Treasure," but translates more accurately as "Jesus, my Joy." At the offertory, we hear the choir sing the fugal movement of Bach's motet of the same name. This movement features not one but two subjects in its fugue: the first is a setting of the opening phrase, "Ihr aber seid nicht Fleischlich, sonder Geistlich" ("You, however, are not of the flesh, but of the the spirit"). Bach rhetorically illustrates "Geistlich" ("spirit") with many moving sixteenth notes, a frequent illustration for the Holy Spirit in the German Baroque language of musical affects and figures. The second subject sets "so anders Gottest Geist in euch wohnet" ("since the spirit of God lives otherwise in you"), which he hear first with many overlapping entrances, existing simultaneously with each other, just as the spirit exists alongside each person. Finally, the rhetorical statement is completed with the combination of both subjects together in perfect unity; listen for parts joining together in duets, moving smoothly in parallel thirds towards the final cadence.

At Communion, the choral offering is by Thomas Tallis, featuring a meditation on the "Light of Light," a fitting text as we approach the feast of the Transfiguration in this season of light. The closing voluntary features the flowery music of the French Baroque; the title means "bells," which Lebégue illustrates through quick, alternating notes and carillon-like scales.


Sunday, February 1, 2015


~ The Fourth Sunday after the Epiphany ~


Opening Voluntary: Air, by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Gloria"Gloria," from Communion Service in F, by Harold Darke (1888-1976)

Psalm: Psalm 111, setting by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: Valediction, by David Conte (b. 1955)

Sanctus: "Sanctus," from Communion Service in F, by Harold Darke

Communion Anthem: "Agnus Dei," from Communion Service in F, by Harold Darke
Closing Voluntary:
Vesper Voluntary VIII, by Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934)

 

Sunday, January 25, 2015

 

~ The Third Sunday after the Epiphany ~


Opening Voluntary: Prelude in C Major, BWV 573 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Sing praise to God (Mit freuden zart)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 111, setting by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: Laudate Dominum, by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)

Offertory Hymn: From all that dwell below the skies (Old 100th)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: Holy is the True Light,  by W.H. Harris (1883-1973)

Communion Hymn: Shepherd of souls (St. Agnes)

Recessional Hymn: O Zion, haste (Tidings)

Closing Voluntary: Fugue in C Major, BWV 573, by J.S. Bach


Sunday, January 18, 2015

 

~ The Second Sunday after the Epiphany ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Liebster Jesu, wir sind hir, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Christ whose glory fills the skies (Ratisbon)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 139:1-5, 12-17, setting by Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-1918)

Baptismal Hymn: Like the murmur of a dove's song (Bridegroom)

Offertory Anthem: Ezekiel Saw The Wheel, by William Dawson (1899-1990)

Offertory Hymn: Blessed Jesus, at thy word (Liebster Jesu)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: On Jordan's Stormy Banks I Stand, Traditional, arr. Rigdon McIntosh

Communion Hymn: Take my life, and let it be (Hollingside)

Recessional Hymn: Ye Servants of God (Paderborn)

Closing Voluntary: Liebster Jesu, wir sind hir, by Wayne L. Wold (b. 1966)

 

 

~ The Service of Evensong ~

for

The Feast of Martin Luther King

 


Prelude Recital: Eartha Lamkin, Vocalist, and Dr. John Lamkin II, Trumpet

     Give Me Jesus, traditional Spiritual, arr. Faye López and Mark López

     I Want Jesus to Walk With Me, traditional Spiritual, arr. Edward Boatner

     He's Got the Whole World in His Hand, traditional Spiritual, arr. Margaret Bonds

     Every Time I Feel the Spirit, traditional Spiritual, arr. John Carter

     There is a Balm in Gilead, traditional Spiritual, arr. Lani Smith

     "Come Sunday," from Black, Brown, and Beige, by Duke Ellington (1899-1974)

     We Shall Overcome, traditional Spiritual, arr. Lamkin, Lamkin, & Buchanan

Processional Hymn: In Christ there is no East or West (McKee, African-American Spiritual)

Preces and Reponses: William Smith (1603-1645)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light (The Eighth Tune)

Psalm: Psalm 77:11-20, setting by Ray Francis Brown

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis: Evening Service, by Thomas Morley (1557-1602)

Anthem: Ezekiel Saw The Wheel, by William Dawson (1899-1990)

Recessional Hymn: Lift Every Voice and Sing (Lift Every Voice)

Closing Voluntary: Improvisation on We Shall Overcome, by Douglas Buchanan



Sunday, January 11, 2015


~ The First Sunday after the Epiphany ~


Opening Voluntary: Prelude sur’ l’Introit de l’Épiphanie, by Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Processional Hymn: Hail to the Lord’s anointed (Es flog ein klein Waldvogelein)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 29, Setting by Percy Buck (1871-1947)

Offertory Anthem: Lauds, by George Dyson (1883-1964)

Offertory Hymn: Thou whose almighty word  (Moscow)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: Lux Aeterna, by Maurice Duruflé

Communion Hymn: Christ, when for us you were baptized  (Caithness)

Recessional Hymn: Oh love, how deep, how broad, how high  (Deus turoum militum)

Closing Voluntary:   Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott, by F.W. Zachau (1663-1712)


Epiphany is a season of light; suitably, both anthems for this Sunday are meditations on that subject. George Dyson's setting of the poem Lauds (which folows the Christmas season well, beginning with "Ye that have spent the silent night in sleep and quiet rest, and joy to see the light that riseth in the east") is filled with quintessentially Edwardian musical material: tonal and consonant imitative passages interspersed with dramatic chromaticism to bring out the meaning of the text (his final setting of "light" utilizes a Neapolitan chord--a major harmony built on the lowered second scale degree--a harmony Beethoven would also use to denote "light"). Though it may seem strange to hear a portion of the Requieum text in this season, Durufe's luscious setting of the "Lux Aeterna" ("Eternal Light") pairs too well with the spirit of the day (featuring the opening passages of Genesis, "let there be light") to leave out. Duruflé sets the original chant of the mass against soft pillows of chords, interspersed with harmonic adventures in the organ. This is paired with the prelude, a similarly styled fantasia on the Introit for Epiphany. The postlude features the Germanic Baroque composer Zachau and his contrapuntal realization of the chorale "Come, Holy Ghost, Lord God," a fitting prayer on the Sunday which witnesses the Baptism of Christ.

 

Sunday, January 4, 2015


~ The Second Sunday after Christmas ~


Opening Voluntary: Double canon on Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Processional Hymn: How bright appears the Morning Star (Wie schön leuchtet)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the Highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 84: 1-8, setting by C.H.H. Parry (1848-1918)

Offertory Anthem: In the Bleak Midwinter, arr. by Douglas Buchanan after Gustav Holst and Harold Darke

Offertory Hymn: On this day, earth shall ring (Personent hodie)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: The Coventry Carol, Traditional English

Communion Hymn: Let all mortal flesh keep silence (Picardy)

Recessional Hymn: Joy to the world! (Antioch)

Closing Voluntary:  Fughetta on I Saw Three Ships, by Richard Proulx (1937-2010)

 

Sunday, December 28, 2014


~ The First Sunday after Christmas ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Two settings of Greensleeves, by Richard Purvis (1913-1994) and Emma Lou Diemer (b. 1927)

Processional Hymn: Angels, from the realms of glory (Regent Square)

Gloria: "Glory to God in the highest," by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Sequence Hymn: Of the Father's love begotten (Divinum mysterium)

Offertory Hymn: Good Christian friends, rejoice (In dulci jubilo)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Robert Powell

Communion Hymn: It came upon a midnight clear (Carol)

Recessional Hymn: The first Nowell (The first Nowell)

Closing Voluntary:  In Dulci Jubilo, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)


Guest Organist: George Sack

 

Thursday, December 25, 2014


~ The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Puer Nobis Nascitur ("A Son is Born for Us"), by J.P. Sweelinck (1562-1621)

Processional Hymn: O come, all ye faithful (Adeste fidelis)

Trisagion: "Holy God, Holy and Mighty," by Alexander Achangelsky

Offertory Hymn: O little town of Bethlehem (St. Louis)

Recessional Hymn: Joy to the world! (Antioch)

Closing Voluntary:  Gottes Sohn ist Kommen ("God's Son is Come"), by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

 

Wednesday, December 24, 2014


~ The Eve of The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ ~


A Prelude of Carols: Jesus Christ the Apple Tree, by Elizabeth Poston (1905-1987)

                                      Ding Dong! Merrily on High, traditional English, arr. Charles Wood (1866-1926)

                                      Of the Father's Love begotten (Divinum mysterium)

                                      Dank sagen wir alle, from the Christmas Oratorio of Henirich Schütz (1658-1672)

                                      A Spotless Rose, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

                                      While shepherds watcher their flocks by night (Winchester Old)

                                      The Sussex Carol, traditional English, arr. David Wilcocks (b. 1919)


Opening Voluntary: In Dulci Jubilo, by Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

                                      In Dulci Jubilo, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Once in royal David's city (Irby)

Gloria: Angels we have heard on high (Gloria)

Psalm: Psalm 96, setting by David Hurd (b. 1950)

Sequence Hymn: O come, all ye faithful (Adeste fideles)

Offertory Anthem: This Day Christ Was Borne., by William Byrd (c. 1540-1623)

Offertory Hymn: Lo, how a Rose e'er blooming (Es ist ein Ros)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Communion Anthem: In Dulci Jubilo, by Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795-1856)

Communion Hymn: What child is this (Greensleeves)

                                      Silent night, holy night (Stille Nacht)

Recessional Hymn: Hark! The herald angels sing (Mendelssohn)

Closing Voluntary: Variations on a Noel (Grand Jeu, et duo), by Louis-Claude Daquin (1694-1772)

 

Sunday, December 21, 2014

 

~ The Fourth Sunday of Advent ~


A Service of Nine Lessons and Carols


Opening Voluntary: Adeste Fidelis , by Charles Ives (1874-1954)

Introit: Advent Matins Responsory, by G.P. da Palestrina (c. 1525-1594)

Processional Hymn: O Come, O Come Emmanuel (Veni, veni)

Invitatory Carol: Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

The Liturgy of the Word: The Nine Lessons and Carols

The First Lesson: Genesis 2:4b-9, 15-25

    Hymn: Creator of the Stars of Night (Conditor alme siderum)
The Second Lesson: Genesis 3:1-22

    Carol: Adam Lay yBounden, by Peter Warlock (1894-1930)

The Third Lesson: Baruch 4:36 - 5:9

    Hymn: People Look East (Besançon)
The Fourth Lesson: Isaiah 40:1-11

    Carol: O Thou, the Central Orb of Righteous Love, by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

The Fifth Lesson: Isaiah 11:1-9

    Hymn: Lo How a Rose E'er Blooming (Es ist ein Ros)

The Sixth Lesson: Luke 1: 26-39

    Hymn: The Angel Gabriel from Heaven Came (Gabriel's Message)

The Seventh Lesson: Luke 1:39-45

    Carol: Magnificat, by Thomas Morley (c. 1557-1602)

The Eighth Lesson: Hebrews 1:1-12

    Carol: Rorate Coeli, by G.P. da Palestrina

The Ninth Lesson: John 1:1-14

    Hymn: O Come, All ye Faithful (Adeste Fidelis)

Offertory Anthem: Dank sagen wir alle ("Now thank we all"), from The Christmas Oratorio, by Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672)

Offertory Hymn: "From all that dwell below the skies" (Old Hundredth)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Jesus Christ, the Apple Tree, by Elizabeth Poston (1905-1987)

Recessional Hymn: Lo, he comes with clouds descending (Merton)

Closing Voluntary:  In Dulci Jubilo, by J.S. Bach


The Service of Nine Lessons and Carols as we know it orginated at King's College, Cambridge in 1918. When combined with a Eucharist, it serves as the Liturgy of the Word in its entirety, encompassing the lessons and sermon in an offering of music alternating between Hymns (sung by choir and congregation) and Carols (sung by choir alone) that serve to enlighten and enliven the spoken word. The lessons traditionally culminate in the opening of the Gospel of John, "In the beginning was the word," following which is sung Adeste Fidelis. As this is a service of Advent Lessons and Carols, the texts focus upon the narrative leading to the birth of Christ (hence the processional hymn Veni, veni Emmanuel rather than the traditional Christmas hymn, Once in Royal David's City), from the Creation, to the words of the Prophets, to the arrival of the Angel Gabriel and Mary's interactions with Elizabeth, pregnant with John the Baptist.  Ultimately, this liturgy serves as a capstone to Advent, distilling the message of the season and preparing the arrival of the Christ child.


Following the Liturgy of the Word, the choir sings the final movement of Schütz's Weihnachtshistorie, or "Christmas Oratorio," followed by Elizabeth Poston's sumptuously simple setting of Jesus Christ, the Apple Tree. The service concludes with Bach's florid choral-prelude In Dulci Jubilo, the traditional closing voluntary for the Service of Nine Lessons and Carols in Cambridge.

 

Sunday, December 14, 2014


~ The Third Sunday of Advent ~


Opening Voluntary: The Angel Gabriel, by Monte Mason (b. 1949)

Processional Hymn: The Word whom earth and sea and sky (Puer nobis)

Trisagion: "Holy God, Holy and Mighty," by Alexander Achangelsky

Canticle: Canticle 15, the Song of Mary (Magnificat), Fauxbourdon setting by Thomas Morley (c. 1557-1602) based on Plainsong Tone VIII.1

Offertory Anthem: Magnificat (from the "Collegium Regale" Evening Service), by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Offertory Hymn: The angel Gabriel from heaven came (Gabriel's Message)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: A Spotless Rose, by Herbert Howells

Communion Hymn: Ye who claim the faith of Jesus (Julion)

Recessional Hymn: Hark, a thrilling voice is sounding (Merton)

Closing Voluntary:  Selections from Magnificat-Fugen, (Tone VI, numbers 3 and 10), by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)


In the Revised Common Lectionary, one of the later weeks of Advent is set aside to honor the Virgin Mary, sometimes referred to as "Rose" or "Magnificat" Sunday. As the Fourth Sunday of Advent will focus on a service of Nine Lessons and Carols, this year we observe Magnificat Sunday on the third week of advent. On this Sunday, we hear two settings of the Magnificat, or Song of Mary (from the Latin Magnificat anima mea, "My soul doth magnify the Lord"). The first, sung as the canticle, is by English Renaissance composer Thomas Morley, and set as plainsong in fauxbourdon (a simple form of chordal accompaniment common on England and the European Continent in the late Medieval and Renaissance periods). The second, more elaborate setting, is by the great litrugical composer Herbert Howells, featuring the voices of the women of the chorus. This is paired with Howell's sublime setting of A Spotless Rose, an alternate translation of the more familiar text "Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming." Its wintry, windy counterpoint is a perfect companion to the liturgical and meterological season. The service ends with selections from Pachelbel's collections of fugues based on a variety of Magnificat chants, a jubilant end to Rose Sunday.


Sunday, December 7, 2014

 

~ The Second Sunday of Advent ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Two settings of Freu dich Sehr, by Egil Hovland (b. 1924) and Gerald Near (b. 1942)

Processional Hymn: Comfort, comfort ye my people (Freu dich Sehr)

Trisagion: "Holy God, Holy and Mighty," by Alexander Achangelsky

Psalm: Psalm 85: 1-2, 8-13, sung in Plainsong Tone I.2, antiphon and fauxbourdon adapted by Douglas Buchanan

Offertory Anthem: This is the record of John, by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Offertory Hymn: On Jordan's bank the Baptist's cry (Winchester New)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: O Thou, the central of of righteous Love, by Orlando Gibbons

Communion Hymn: There's a voice in the wilderness crying (Ascension)

Recessional Hymn: Prepare the way, O Zion (Bereden väg för Herran)

Closing Voluntary:  Bereden väg för Herran, by Paul Manz (b. 1919)


Traditionally, the second week of Advent focuses on John the Baptist and his witness to the coming of Christ, and is frequently paired with Isaiah's message" "Comfort ye, my people." This week, we sing together the rhythmically active, frequently syncopated hymn "Comfort, comfort ye my people," proceeded by two disparate settings of the same chorale tune. The setting by Egil Hovland is relaxed and chant-like, waiting; the other, by Gerald Near, is more florid, and active. These two contrasting affects resonate with the nature of the Advent season, a season not only of meditation, but of active preparation and expectation. This is also demonstrated in the anthems this week: Gibbons' setting This is the record of John relates the priests' questioning of the Baptist, who responds, in a richly scored setting first for tenor solo and then for the entire chorus, that he is not, but rather the one who "prepares the way of the Lord." (Interestingly, the tenor soloists statement seems an echo of the tune "On Jordan's bank the Baptist's cry," though the tune Winchester New would not be written until fifty years after Gibbon's death.) Gibbons' setting of the poem "O Thou, the central orb of righteous love" moves between meditative solo statements and active, triple-time verses entreating: "Come, quickly, come!" Even in the meditations, though, the soloist sings subtle canzona rhythms tht would have been common in viol consort music of the day, implying a sense of activity underlying the prayerful serenity.

 

Sunday, November 30, 2014


~ The First Sunday of Advent ~


Opening Voluntary: Nun komm, der heiden Heiland, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Procession: The Great Litany

Trisagion: "Holy God, Holy and Mighty," by Alexander Achangelsky

Psalm: Psalm 80:1-7, 16-18, sung in Plainsong, Tone IV.4; antiphon and fauxbourdon by Douglas Buchanan

Offertory Anthem: Rorate Coeli, by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525-1594)

Offertory Hymn: "Sleepers wake!" A voice astounds us (Wachet auf)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: My Lord, what a Morning, arranged by Douglas Buchanan

Communion Hymn: O heavenly Word (Verbum supernum prodiens)

Recessional Hymn: Lo! He comes, with clouds descending (Helmsley)

Closing Voluntary: Fantasia on Helmsley, by Lloyd Webber (1914-1982)

 

The first Sunday of Advent in the second year of the Revised Common Lectionary opens with apocalyptic foreshadowing: heavens opening, clouds descending, and the entreaty to stay alert, awake, and watchful. In this spirit, the music for this, the first Sunday of the Liturgical New Year, begins with Bach's brief though tightly expressive chorale prelude Nun komm, der heiden Heiland ("Savior of the Nations, Come"), along with one of the oldest English-language chants, The Great Litany. In this spirit, we also offer our psalm-singing in Plainsong chant, occasionally ornamented in fauxbourdon voicing. Fauxbourdon (originally meaning "false bass") is a means of adding simple harmonic motion to a single melodic line, and was frequently utilized by Medieval and Renaissance English composers before spreading to continental Europe.


The theme of the anthems resonates with the lectionary for the day. At the Eucharist, we hear a chromatically-tinged arrangement of the African-American spiritual "My Lord, what a Morning," rich with apocalyptic imagery and an inherent double-meaning: "My Lord, what a mo(u)rning, when the stars begin to fall." To contrast this, at the offertory, we hear Palestrina's jubilant entreaty Rorate Coeli, in which the falling heavens are a cause for hope at the coming of the Savior:


Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above,

And let the clouds pour down righteousness:
Let the earth open and bring forth the Savior.

Show us thy mercy, O Lord, and grant us thy salvation:

Come, O Lord, and do not delay. Alleluia




Sunday, November 23, 2014: Christ the King

 

~ The Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 29 ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Crown Imperial March, by William Walton (1902-1983)

Processional Hymn: Alleluia! Sing to Jesus! (Hyfrydol)

Gloria: Glory be to God on High, from Communion Service in D, by Kenneth Leighton (1929-1988)

Psalm: Psalm 95: 1-7a setting by Robert Prescott Stewart (1825-1894)

Offertory Anthem: Antiphon, by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Offertory Hymn: Where cross the crowded ways of life (Gardiner)

Sanctus: Sanctus and Benedictus, from Communion Service in D, by Kenneth Leighton

Communion Anthem: Agnus Dei, from Communion Service in D, by Kenneth Leighton

Communion Hymn: Shepherd of souls (St. Agnes)

Recessional Hymn: Crown him with many crowns (Diademata)

Closing Voluntary: The Great Gate of Kiev, by Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)


 

~ The Service of Evensong ~

for

The Feast of Christ the King

 

Prelude Recital: Ms. Danielle Buonaiuto, soprano, and Ms. Bethany Pietroniro, piano

 

     ~ Songs about Spring, nos. 2-4, by Domenick Argento (b. 1927)

               2. Spring is like a Perhaps-hand

               3. In Just-spring

               4. When Spring comes

     ~  Sure on this Shining Night, by Samuel Barber (1910-1981)

     ~ "O Salutaris Hostia," from Sacred Songs, by Michael Rickelton (b. 1983)

     ~ Scots and Waters (world premiere) by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

               1. Psalm 23

               2. The Skye Boat Song

               3. Loch Lomond

      ~ Selected Lieder by Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

               Die Nacht, op. 10, no. 3

               Morgen, op. 27, no. 4

               Zueignung, op. 27, no. 1

 

Processional Hymn: Abide with me (Eventide)

Preces and Reponses: Kenneth Leighton (1929-1988)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light ("Conditor alme siderum")

Psalm: Psalm 145, setting by Joseph Barnby

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis: Evening Service ("Collegium Regale"), by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Anthem: O, Come let us Sing unto the Lord (c. 1590-1644)

Recessional Hymn: Christ is made the sure foundation (Westminster Abbey)

Closing Voluntary: Psalm-Prelude, set II, no. 3 (Psalm 33: "Sing unto Him a new song"), by Herbert Howells


 

Sunday, November 16, 2014


~ The Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 28 ~


Opening Voluntary: Theme and Variations ("The Woods so Wild"), Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Processional Hymn: Lord Christ, when first thou cam’st   (Mit Freuden zart)

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, adapted from Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Psalm: Psalm 90: 1-8, 12, setting by Orlando Gibbons

Offertory Anthem: Almighty and Everlasting God, by Orlando Gibbons

Offertory Hymn: I want to walk as a child of the light (Houston)

Sanctus: Holy, Holy, Holy Lord, adapted from Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem: O Sacred Feast, by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Communion Hymn: Strengthen for Service, Lord (Malabar)

Recessional Hymn: O God, our help in ages past (St. Anne)

Closing Voluntary:  Fugue in E-flat Major, BWV 552b ("St. Anne"), by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

 

This week's music draws inspiration from the Psalmist's poetry regarding God as everlasting and eternal. Infinite temporality is not something to which the human mind is suited, yet it is frequently the subject (or the object) of much music, be it secular or sacred. Gibbons' setting of the Collect text includes a wonderful portion, praying to God to "stretch out your right hand." Gibbons sets these "stretching" lines with longer note values, creating the sense that we are reaching through time to God--or that God is reaching to us. Bach's Fugue in E-flat major is not only a brilliant essay in Baroque counterpoint, but also an exploration of the Baroque conception of "sacred time" as cyclical and infinite. Throughout the course of the fugue (which is actually three fugues in one--Bach is never one to leave out Trinitarian associations if he can help it), Bach explores a variety of different meters, that is, different musical temporalities. The closing section serves to unify these disparate meters into one, creating a crystalized meditation on eternity.

 

Sunday, November 9, 2014


~ The Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 27 ~


Ingathering Sunday

 

Opening Voluntary: Wachet Auf ("Keep Awake!"), J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Lift up your heads, ye mighty gates (Truro)

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, adapted from Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Psalm: Psalm 70, setting by George A. Macferran

Offertory Anthem: Dear Lord and Father of Mankind, by C.H.H. Parry (1848-1918)

Offertory Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green)

Sanctus: Holy, Holy, Holy Lord, adapted from Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem: Haste thee O God (after Psalm 70), by Adrian Batten (1591-1637)

Communion Hymn: Draw nigh and take the Body of the Lord (Bangor Antiphoner)

Recessional Hymn: Jerusalem, my happy home (Land of Rest)

Closing Voluntary: Toccata, by Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725)

 

This week's Gospel text reminds us to "keep awake" in ready for the presence of God. This is particularly relevant at this time of year as we take time to be thankful for what we have, what we can give, and what we can do better. In the spirit of Ingathering Sunday, we bring our "first fruits," our best offerings ("as those of old") to the altar. By doing so, we remain open to our mission in the world; in the words of Parry's hymn-anthem:


Breathe through the hearts of our desire Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire, speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still small voice of calm!

 

 

Sunday, November 2, 2014


~ All Saint's ~

 

Opening Voluntary: In Paradisum, Jean-Yves Daniel-Lesur (1908-2002)

Processional Hymn: For all the saints (Sine Nomine)

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, adapted from Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Psalm: Psalm 34:1-10, setting adapted from Eventide, by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Anthem: Faire is the Heaven, by William Henry Harris (1883-1973)

Offertory Hymn: I sing a song of the Saints of God (Grand Isle)

Sanctus: Holy, Holy, Holy Lord, adapted from Franz Schubert

Communion Anthem: Blessed are the Pure in Heart, by Henry Walford Davies (1869-1941)

Communion Hymn: Jerusalem the Golden (Ewing)

Recessional Hymn: Who are these like stars appearing (Zeuch mich, zeuch mich)

Closing Voluntary: March, from "Prelude to Richard III," by William Walton

 

William Henry Harris' Faire is the Heaven is one of the enduring gems of Anglican choral music. For double choir, it is a sublime meditation on eterntiy, with illustrative passages (trumpet-blast-like arpeggios occur to illustrate the "Angels and Archangels") as well as serene cadence that seem to unfurl like slow, holy nebulas of sound. The fractal-like nature of the text draws us deeper and deeper--or higher and higher--into the eye of the heavens, ascending, with the music, and with saints, towards an indescribable holiness.


"Faire is the Heaven"

Text by Edmund Spenser (1552-1599)


Faire is the heaven, where happy soules have place

In full enjoyment of felicitie,

Whence they doe still behold the glorious face

Of the Divine Eternall Majestie;

Yet farre more faire be those bright Cherubins,

Which all with golden wings are overdight,

And those eternall burning Seraphins,

Which from their faces dart out fiery light;

Yet fairer than they both, and much more bright,

Be th' Angels and Archangels, which attend On God's owne Person,

without rest or end. These then in faire each other farre excelling,

As to the Highest they approach more neare,

Yet is the Highest farre beyond all telling,

Fairer than all the rest which there appear,

Though all their beauties joynd together were;

How then can mortall tongue hope to expresse

The image of such endlesse perfectnesse?

 


Sunday, October 26, 2014


~ The Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 25A ~


Opening Voluntary: Voluntary in C Major, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Processional Hymn: Christ is made the sure foundation (Westminster Abbey)

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 1, setting by Gerre Hancock (1934-2012)

Offertory Anthem: O God, Thou Art My God, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Offertory Hymn: How lovely is thy dwelling place (Brother James' Air)

Sanctus: Holy, Holy, Holy Lord, by Robert Powell

Communion Anthem: I Sat Down Under His Shadow, by Edward Bairstow (1874-1946)

Communion Hymn: Come with us, O belssed Jesus (Werde munter)

Recessional Hymn: All hail the power of Jesus' name (Coronation)

Closing Voluntary: Voluntary in A Major (on the Doxology, "Old 100th")


The music of Henry Purcell forms a touchstone for meditation this week. The service is bookended by two of his festive voluntaries, the opening composition based on a "free" idea, with the closing work based on the hymn tune "Old 100th," sung last week as the Offertory hymn. At this weeks offertory, we hear the choir's offering of Purcell's O God, Thou Art My God, a verse anthem from the English Baroque. In the Anglican tradition, a verse anthem meant that some sections were sung by the full choir, and some by subsets of the choir. This could mean that the choir is divided by section, or into halves (cantus and decani, the right and left sides of the alter). Purcell's text resonates first with the psalm: the firm statement of the title calls to mind the psalm's mention of the righteous, whose "delight is in the law of the Lord." Further, the anthem's text "my soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh also longeth after me," reflects upon the third verse of the Psalm:


     They are like trees planted by streams of water, bearing fruit
     in due season, with leaves that do not wither;

     everything they do shall prosper.


The solid faith of the work seems to follow the "greatest commandment" mentioned in the Gosepl reading, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and all your soul, and with all your mind." The anthem ends with a back-and-forth "Hallelujah" exchange between the cantus and the decani; this tune is so catchy, it has even become a hymn: in fact, this ending "Hallelujah" is the music that makes up this week's opening hymn, Christ is Made the Sure Foundation. The communion anthem, by Edward Bairstow, knits these texts even closer together. Bairstow's choice of text, from the Song of Songs, calls to mind sitting beneath God's protection, mentioned both in Purcell's anthem ("therefore under the show of Thy wings will I rejoice") and the mention of David in the Gospel ("Sit at me right hand, until I put your enemies under your feet.") Likewise, the mention of the "sweet fruit" in the Song of Songs pulls in the reference of sustenance in the Psalm. But it is love that is at the center here: in Bairstow, the high point is the text "his banner over me was love;" in Purcell's composition, he emphasizes "For thy loving kindness is better than life itself" by changing mode and meter in his setting. And these point to the center of both the great commandments: to love the Lord, and to love our neighbor.

 

Sunday, October 19, 2014


~ The Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 24A ~


Opening Voluntary: Prelude in G Major, by Nicolaus Bruhns (1665-1697)

Processional Hymn: Father eternal, Ruler of creation (Langham)

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 96: 1-9, setting by David Hurd (b. 1950)

Offertory Anthem: O Come Let Us Sing Unto the Lord, by Robert Ramsey (1616-1644)

Offertory Hymn: From all that dwell below the skies (Old 100th)

Communion Anthem: Cantate Domino, by Giuseppe Pitoni (1657-1743)

Communion Hymn: Lord, we have come at your own invitation (O quanta qualia)

Recessional Hymn: Jesus shall reign where'er the sun (Duke Street)

Closing Voluntary: Fugue in G Major, by Nicolaus Bruhns


This week, our music draws its inspiration from the Psalm for the day, number 96: "Sing to the Lord a new song; sing to the Lord, all the whole earth. Sing to the Lord and bless his Name; proclaim the good news of hi salvation from day to day." David Hurd's setting is redolent of the Anglican Chant tradition, but with subtle tinges of novelty that color the harmonies. Both the offertory and communion anthems resonate with the Psalm as well. Robert Ramsey's setting builds with active, dance-like counterpoint subtley colored with chromaticism, alternating between thorny, rugged harmonies and beautiful expanses, much like the composer's native Scotland. Following this, the offertory hymn "From all that dwell below the skies" paints a picture of all of creation raising voices in praise. At the Eucharist, Pitoni's classic setting of the "Sing to the Lord a new song" text similarly draws on dance-like rhtyhms. Bookending the service is German Baroque composer Nicolaus Bruhns' Prelude and Fugue in G Major; though traditional in title, in holds a variety of novel-sounding musical ideas, including the use of double pedaling (which keeps both the feet active at the same time) and metric transformations of the fugue subject, shifting between duple and triple meters to always keep the music fresh and new.

 

Sunday, October 12, 2014


~ The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 23A ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Pastorale, by Arcangelo Correli (1653-1713)

Processional Hymn: Christ whose glory fills the skies ("Ratisbon")

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis, by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 23, setting by Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Offertory Anthem: Psalm 23, for Women's Chorus, setting by Franz Schubert

Offertory Hymn: My God, thy table now is spread ("Rockingham")

Communion Anthem: Tu solus qui facis mirabilia ("You alone perform wonders"), by Josquin des Prez (1440-1521)

Communion Hymn: Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness ("Shmücke dich")

Recessional Hymn: Rejoice, ye pure in heart! ("Marion")

Closing Voluntary: Rigaudon, by André Campra (1660-1744)

 

Our service begins and ends with leading composers of the Baroque era. First, we hear the graceful  interpretation of a Pastorale, the lilting rhythms and drones calling to mind the shepherd's pipes that would have been heard on the Italian hillsides by Corelli. This sets the stage for the lessons and for Psalm 23, which speak of the ways in which God provides care and shelter. There are two settings of Psalm 23 in this service: first, a chant sung by the entire choir, and, during the offertory, a lovely 4-part setting for women's voices, in the lush style of Schubert's Romantic-era art songs, or Lieder. Another facet of God is referenced as well in today's lessons: God the miracle-worker and accomplisher of great deeds. During the communion, the men of the choir sing the Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer Josquin des Prez's setting of Tu solus qui facis mirabilia, which emphasizes the wondrous: "You alone it is who performs wonders, you alone are the Creator." Interpolated in this Latin text is the archaic French phrase "D'ung aultre amer," or "to love another would be deceitful." This phrase is taken from a setting by the great composer a generation before Josquin, Johannes Ockeghem. Josquin provides an additional layer of meeting by quoting not only the text of Ockeghem's setting, but the music as well, creating a deep and rich texture that would have been very common in this region during the early Renaissance. Lastly, we leave our reverie of wonders with a grand French Baroque dance by André Campras, his famous Rigaudon.


 

~ The Service of Evensong ~

 

Prelude Recital: Ms. Jasmine Hogan, harp

     ~ Sinfonia, from Partita no. 2 in C Minor, BWV 825, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

     ~ Låtar, for Harp, arr. Hogan

               Reel

               Water Spirit

               Ox Dance

     ~ Allegrement (Sonatine, Op. 30), by Marcel Tournier (1870-1951)

     ~ Ecuador, by Alfredo Orlando Ortiz

Processional Hymn: There's a widenss in God's mercy ("Beecher")

Preces and Reponses: Setting by Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light ("Conditor alme siderum")

Psalm: Psalm 113, setting by Ray Francis Brown

Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis: Thomas Tomkins

Anthem: Lord, for Thy Tender Mercy's Sake, by Richard Farrant (1525-1580)

Recissional Hymn: The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended ("St. Clement")

Closing Voluntary: Toccata, Fugue, and Chaconne in C Major, by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)


The St. David's 2014-2015 Music Series begins with the time-honored, quintessentially Anglican Service of Evensong. This week, the service opens with a prelude recital by internationally acclaimed harpist Jasmine Hogan in a presentation of folk and concert works (some of her own arrangement). The readings for the daily office provide a fitting point of departure for the start of the musical year. In Micah 6: 1-8, we are to "Hear what the Lord says: Rise, plead your case before the mountains, and let the hills hear your voice." Themes of mercy and faith are also prominent, as in the story of the Canaanite woman in Matthew 15: 21-28. References to these readings combine in Richard Farrant's setting of "Lord, for thy tender mercy's sake":


Lord, for thy tender mercy's sake, lay not our sins to our charge,

but forgive that is past and give us grace to ammend our sinful lives:

to decline from sin, and incline to virtue,

that we may walk in a perfect heart, before thee now and evermore.


This last line resonates with the close of the reading from Micah: "He has told you, O mortal, what is good: and what does the Lord require of you but to do justive, and to love kindness, and the walk humbly with your God?"


The Preces,  Responses, and Canticles are, fittingly for St. David's, composed by the Welsh-born composer Thomas Tomkins. The redolent of the traditional Renaissance English style, Tomkins frequently departs from the harmonic progressions that are more common in Tallis and Byrd, creating a unique expression of these sacred texts.


Sunday, October 5, 2014


~ The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 22 A ~


Sung Mass Setting: Missa Brevis in D Major, by W.A. Mozart 


Opening Voluntary: Chorale Prelude, by Healey Willan

Gloria: Gloria in Excelsis Deo, by W.A. Mozart 

Psalm: Sung in Anglican Chant by the choir, setting by Jonathan Batishill

Offertory Anthem: Christ hath a garden, by Healey Willan

Sanctus: Sanctus, by W.A. Mozart

Music at the Communion:  Agnus Dei, by W.A. Mozart

Closing Voluntary: Toccata in 7, by John Rutter

 

 This week, our worship includes the choir's offering of Mozart's Missa Brevis in D Major. An exciting example of Mozart's late style, the music is filled with contrapuntal tricks, which Mozart learned from studying Bach in the last years of his life, as well as his ebullient rhythmic style. Juxtaposed with this are moments of grandeur: the opening of the Sanctus creates a full texture reminiscent of the Renaissance master Palestrina. This is juxtaposed by Healey Willan's quiet, introspective works: the gentle flowing of his Chorale Prelude opening our ears to worship, and preparing us for the glistening, sometimes jazz-like harmonies of his setting of Christ hath a garden. Both this anthem and Jonathan Batishill's setting of the psalm explore the theme of the vineyard-garden as metaphor for the ChristIan community. Our service concludes with Rutter's joyous Toccata in 7, carrying a similar verve and rhythmic vigor as  Mozart's setting of the Mass text. 

 

 

Sunday, September 28, 2014


~ The Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 21 A ~

 

Opening Voluntary performed by Leo Wanenchak, guest organist

Processional Hymn: At the name of Jesus ("King's Weston")

Gloria: Glory to God in the highest, setting by William Mathias (1934-1922)

Psalm: Psalm 25: 1-8, sung in Anglican Chant by the choir, setting by William Crotch (1775-1847)

Offertory Anthem: The Eyes of All Wait Upon Thee, O Lord, by William H. Harris (1883-1973)

Offertory Hymn: What wondrous love is this ("Wondrous Love")

Music at the Communion: Behold, the Tabernacle of God, by William H. Harris

Commuion Hymn: Bread of the World ("Rendez à Dieu")

Recessional Hymn: Sing, ye faithful, sing with gladness ("Finnian")

Closing Voluntary performed by Leo Wanenchak, guest organist

 

The offertory and communion anthems, both by English composer and organist William H. Harris (whose first organist post was at St. David’s Cathedral in Wales), are chosen for their resonance with the simultaneous themes of praise and humility expressed in the lectionary. The text from the letter to the Philippians states that “at the name of Jesus, every knee shall bend” (the inspiration for the processional hymn of the week), and the Psalm begins with a lifting up of the soul to the Lord. The communion anthem likewise includes a declaration of praise: “for the love of who ye do this day, celebrate the joys of the temple with a season of fesitivity,” followed by a closing Alleluia. On the other hand, in the Gospel of Matthew, we are reminded that the “tax collectors and prostitutes” recognized John the Baptist first: the attention is turned from outward appearance towards inward value. The Psalm, set by composer and landscape painter William Crotch, implores likewise to be led in truth and remembered in compassion and love, while the letter to the Phillippians reminds that “it is God who is at work in you.” This plays out in both of Harris’ settings: the communion anthem reminds us that the “Tabernacle of God” is within all, and that “the Spirit of God dwelleth within you;” at the offertory, we are reminded that the “Lord is nigh unto all them that call upon him…the Lord preserveth all them that love him,” an answered prayer in response to the Psalm’s hopes for redemption.


Guest Organist: This week we welcome Leo Wanenchak, who will serve as our guest choir director and organist for services this Sunday. Douglas and Kelly Buchanan are away this weekend for an out-of-state wedding, and will return on Monday. Leo has previously served as a sabbatical replacement and guest performer at St. David’s, and currently serves as Assistant Conductor and Accompanist of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society.


Sunday, September 21, 2014


~ The Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 20 A ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Andante, from Organ Concerto no. 7, G. F. Händel (1685-1759)

Processional Hymn: Guide me, O thou great Jehovah ("Cwm Rhondda)

Gloria: Glory to God in the highest, setting by William Mathias (1934-1922)

Psalm: Psalm 145: 1-8, sung in Anglican Chant by the choir, setting by Joseph Barnby (1818-1896)

Offertory Anthem: Let Thy Hand be Strengthened, by G.F. Händel

Offertory Hymn: Lord of all hopefulness ("Slane")

Music at the Communion: King of Glory, King of Peace, by Walford Davies (1869-1941)

Commuion Hymn: Strengthen for service, Lord (Malabar)

Recessional Hymn: Come, labor on (Ora Labora)

Closing Voluntary: Fugue in E Major, by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)

 

 

Sunday, September 14, 2014


~ The Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 19 A ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Ubi Caritas, David Lasky (b. 1957)

Processional Hymn: O bless the Lord, my soul ("St. Thomas")

Gloria: Glory to God in the highest, setting by William Mathias (1934-1922)

Psalm: Psalm 103:8-13 (Benedic, anima mea), setting by Kellow J. Pye (1812-1901)

Offertory Anthem: Judge Eternal, Robed in Splendor, by Gerre Hancock (1934-2012)

Offertory Hymn: Amazing Grace ("New Britain")

Music at the Communion: Ubi Caritas ("Where there is charity and love"), Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Commuion Hymn: Ubi Caritas (Taizé Community)

Recessional Hymn: O say can you see, by the dawn's early light ("National Anthem")

     sung in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the writing of the text

     by Marylander and Episcopalian, Francis Scott Key (1779-1843)

Closing Voluntary: Concert Variations on the Star Spangled Banner, Dudley S. Buck (1839-1909)

 

 

This Sunday's music emphasizes the necessity of forgiveness; in the epistle to the Romans, we are reminded that, if God alone may cast judgment, then we should not do so. Indeed, we, as humans, are encouraged to offer forgiveness to our brothers and sisters, with the knowledge that God offers forgiveness to us. We hear this in the several settings of Ubi Caritas, the chant that translates as “Where there is charity and love, God is there.” It first appears in David Lasky’s organ fantasia, beginning as a quiet tune and blossoming into an ecstatic statement of inclusivity. The offertory anthem by the great American organist-composer Gerre Hancock, late of St. Thomas’ parish in New York City, follows a similar trajectory: after a fanfare or colorful harmonies, we hear a simple, folk-tune like statement, sweet and secure in its faith; as the work progresses amidst the “crowded clangor” of the city, we hear a desperate plea for peace, before a final confident return to the hope for justice. At communion, we Maurice Duruflé’s classic, sublime setting of the Ubi Caritas chant is complemented by a version from the Taizé community, which invites us all into the prayer for peace and love.



Sunday, September 7, 2014

 

~ St. David's Day (transferred), Opening of the Program Year ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Wie will ich mich freuen ("My Spirit be Joyful"), J.S. Bach

      David Ballou and Yanbin Chen, trumpets

Processional Hymn: Joyful, joyful we adore thee ("Hymn to Joy")

Gloria: Glory to God in the highest, setting by William Mathias

Psalm: Psalm 119:33-40, setting and antiphon by Douglas Buchanan

Offertory Anthem: Antiphon, Benjamin Britten

Offertory Hymn: Lord, make us servants of your peace ("Dickinson College")

Music at the Communion: A New Commandment, Thomas Tallis

Commuion Hymn: My God, thy table now is spread ("Rockingham")

Recessional Hymn: All creatures of our God and king ("Lasst uns erfreuen")

Closing Voluntary: Carillon, Louis Vierne

 

The program year commences with Bach’s festive utterance, Wie will ich mich freuen, originally a duet between tenor and bass from cantata for Easter, BWV 146, is here arranged for two trumpets (ably performed this week by Yanbin Chen and Prof. David Ballou) and organ by the British organist E. Power Biggs. In Bach’s ever-jubilant approach to triple meter, we hear “dactyl” rhythms (“long-short-short”), which Bach frequently used to evoke “dancing” or “joy.” The two voices toss melodies back and forth throughout the movement, hinting at a duality that is also at the heart of Britten’s Antiphon. Taken from a poem by the mystic poet George Herbert, Britten here realizes Herbert’s original intent of the antiphonal (“back-and-forth”) nature of a conversation between humans and angels by portraying the “angelic” words with soprano solos that climb towards the heavens, whilst the humans “crouch” in the low register. The utterances eventually come closer and closer together, until, in a series of mystical, perhaps even unsettling chords, reminiscent of the work’s opening, Britten resolves the “two folds” into “one.” This message of love and unity continues in Tallis’ A New Commandment. One of the handful of “unreformed Roman Catholics” that successfully navigated the religious politics of the Tudor court, Tallis’ flexible compositional style here creates a peaceful and serene message of love between followers of Christ. Our service ends with Vierne’s joyful, clangorous Carillon, built entirely upon a two-bar rhythmic idea that drives towards a ringing climax. Children are invited to come up to the organ console to get a first-hand look!


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