Sundays in Song: 2015-2016

 

The Choir of St. Davids - Easter 2015

 

The Choir of St. David's, directed by Dr. Douglas Buchanan,  performs at morning and evening services

throughout the program year, along with other ensembles including the St. David's Singers,

the Chorister Choir, the Handbell Choir, and the St. David's Players.


Sundays in Song: About this Week's Music

 

September through May we post the hymns and service music,

as well as the choral and instrumental music, that will be included in the 

upcoming Sunday's liturgy. You can also visit past seasons, and explore upcoming selections.

 

*  *  *  *  *

 

Sunday, May 8

 

The Seventh Sunday in Easter

 

 

Opening Voluntary: Finzi's Rest, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Processional Hymn: Hail the day that sees him rise (Llanfair)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest" (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 97, setting by Henry Thomas Smart (1813-1879)

Offertory Anthem: God is Gone Up, by Gerald Finzi (1901-1956)

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Ascendit Deus, by Peter Philips (1560-1628)

Communion Hymn: Come away to the skies (Middlebury)

Recessional Hymn: Alleluia! sing to Jesus! (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary: March for a Joyous Occasion, by Conrad Susa (1935-2013)



Sunday, May 1

The Sixth Sunday in Easter

 

Opening Voluntary: Andante Cantible, by Joseph Jongen (1873-1953)

Processional Hymn: O what their joy and the glory must be (O quanta qualia)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest" (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 67, setting by Kellow J. Pye (1812-1901)

Offertory Anthem: My Beloved Spake, by Patrick Hadley

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Jesus, Lover of My Soul, by Thomas Clark (1775-1859)

Communion Hymn: Now the green blade riseth (Noël nouvelet)

Recessional Hymn: Jerusalem, my happy home (Land of Rest)

Closing Voluntary: Grand Chorus, by Joseph Jongen


Sunday, April 24

The Fifth Sunday in Easter

 

Opening Voluntary: Master Tallis' Testament, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Processional Hymn: Praise, my soul, the King of heaven (Lauda Anima)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest" (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 148, setting by John Goss (1800-1880)

Offertory Anthem: Psalm 148, by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: A New Commandment, by Thomas Tallis (c. 1505-1585)

Communion Hymn: Come, my way, my truth, my life (The Call)

Recessional Hymn: Love divine, all loves excelling (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary: Felix Namque, by Thomas Tallis


Sunday, April 17

The Fourth Sunday in Easter

"Good Shepherd" Sunday

 

Opening Voluntary: Meditation on Brother James' Air, by Harold Darke (1888-1976)

Processional Hymn: Sing ye faithful, sing with gladness (Finnian)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 23, setting by Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Offertory Anthem: O For the Wings of a Dove, by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Brother James' Air ("The Lord's My Shepherd"), by Roger Price (b. 1955)

Communion Hymn: Shepherd of souls (St. Agnes)

Recessional Hymn: Savior, like a shepherd lead us (Sicilian Mariners)

Closing Voluntary: Toccata in F Major, BWV 540, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)


Sunday, April 10

The Third Sunday in Easter

 

Opening Voluntary: O filii et filiae, by Wilbur Held (1914-2015)

Processional Hymn: Come ye faithful, raise the strain (St. Kevin)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 30, by Ray Francis Brown (1897-1964)

Offertory Anthem: Worthy is the Lamb that was Slain, by G.F. Händel

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Haec dies, by William Byrd (c. 1539/40 or 1543-1623)

Communion Hymn: Come, risen Lord, and deign to be our guest (Rosedale)

Recessional Hymn: Ye servants of God (Paderborn)

Closing Voluntary: "Acclamations," from Suite Medieval, by Jean Langlais (1907-1991)


Sunday, April 3

The Second Sunday in Easter

 

Opening Voluntary: Andante con tenerezza, no. II from "Three Quiet Preludes," by Frederick Jacobi (1891-1952)

Processional Hymn: We walk by faith, and not by sight (St. Botolph)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 150, Setting by John Goss (1800-188)

Offertory Anthem: Behold, O God our Deferender, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Offertory Hymn: Love's redeeming work is done (Savannah)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: O Taste and See, by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Communion Hymn: The strife is o'er, the battle done (Victory)

Recessional Hymn: The day of resurrection (Ellacombe)

Closing Voluntary: Prelude, Fugue, and Chaconne, by Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)


Sunday, March 27

Easter Sunday

~ The Sunday of the Resurrection ~


Opening Voluntary: Sarabande, for the Morning of Easter, by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Processional Hymn (at 9:00): Jesus Christ is Risen Today (Easter Hymn)
Processional Hymn (at 11:00): Hail thee, festival day (Salve festa dies)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest" (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 118, v. 1-2, 14-24, by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: Sing ye to the Lord, by Edward Cuthbert Bairstow (1874-1946)

Offertory Hymn: Welcome, happy morning (Fortunatus)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthems:

   This Joyful Eastertide, arr. William H. Harris (1883-1973)

   Sicut cervus, by G.P. da Palestrina (c. 1525-1594)

   Now the Green Blade Riseth, arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Communion Hymns:

   Alleluia, alleluia, give thanks to the risen Lord (Alleluia no. 1)
   Good Christians all, rejoice and sing (Gelobt sei Gott)

Recessional Hymn (at 9:00): He is risen (Unser Herrscher)
Recessional Hymn (at 11:00): Jesus Christ is Risen Today (Easter Hymn)

Closing Voluntary: "Toccata," from Symphony no. 5 in F Major by Charles-Marie Widor (1844-1937)


Saturday, March 26

Holy Saturday

 ~ The Great Vigil of Easter ~


The Exultet: Cantored by Father Scott Bellows

Psalm for the Story of Creation: Psalm 31, Sung in Plainsong

Psalm for the Story of the Flood: Psalm 46, Sung in Plainsong

Canticle for the Story of Israel's Deliverance: Canticle 8, Sung in Plainsong with Antiphon

Psalm for the Story of the Valley of Dry Bones: Psalm 30, Sung in Fauxbourdon, setting by D. Buchanan (b. 1984)

Psalm for the Gathering of God's People: Psalm 126, Anglican Chant setting by C.V. Stanford (1852-1924)

Gloria: “Glory to God in the highest" (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Offertory Anthem: Sicut Cervus, by G.P. da Palestrina (c. 1525-1594)

Offertory Hymn: Come ye people, raise the strain (St. Kevin)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by William Mathias (1934-1992)

Communion Anthem: O Taste and See, by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Recessional Hymn: He is risen, he is risen! (Unser Herrscher)

Closing Voluntary: Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals, adapted by Siegfried Karg-Elert (1877-1933)


Friday, March 25

~ Good Friday ~

Psalm: Psalm 22: 1-11

Gospel Hymn: O sacred head, sore wounded (Herzlich tut mich verlangen)

The Passion According to John: Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

Hymn for the Veneration of the Cross: Ah, holy Jesus (Herzliebster Jesu)

The Solemn Reproaches: Tomás Luis de Victoria

Communion Anthem: God so Loved the World, by John Stainer (1840-1901)


Thursday, March 24

~ Maundy Thursday ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Meditation-Communion, from Suite Medieval, by Jean Langlais (1907-1991)

Processional Hymn: Glory, love, and praise (Benifold)

Kyrie"Lord, have mercy," by Healey Willan

Psalm: Psalm 116: 1, 10-17, Sung in Plainsong

Gospel Hymn: Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love (Chereponi)
Anthem at the Footwashing: Ubi Caritas, by Maurice Duruflé (1902-1986)

Offertory Anthem: Nolo mortem peccatoris, by Thomas Morley (1557/8-1602)

Offertory Hymn: Thou, who at thy first Eucharist didst pray (Tune I)

Sanctus: "Holy, holy, holy," by Healey Willan

Fraction Anthem: "O Lamb of God," by Healey Willan

Communion Anthem: Hide not thy face from us, O Lord, by Richard Farrant (c. 1525-1580)

Communion Hymn: O food to pilgrims given (O Welt, ich muss dich lassen)

Closing HymnNow, my tongue, the mystery telling (Pange lingua)

Psalm at the Stripping of the Altar: Psalm 22: 1-21, sung in Plainsong, Tone IV. 1


Sunday, March 20

Palm Sunday

~ The Sunday of the Passion ~


Psalm for the Liturgy of the Palms: Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29 

Processional Hymn: All glory, laud, and honor (Valet will ich dir geben)

Kyrie: “Lord haver mercy upon us” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 31:9-16, Tone VIII.3

Gospel Hymn: There is a green hill far away (Horsley)

Offertory Anthem: Hear my prayer, by Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: Timor et tremor, by Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

Communion Hymn: My song is love unknown (Love unknown)

Recessional Hymn: Lift high the cross (Crucifer)

(The congregation departs in silence)


Sunday, March 13

The Fifth Sunday in Lent

~ Sunday of the Baltimore Bach Marathon ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Selections from Overture nach Französicher Art, BWB 831, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Hail, thou once despised Jesus (In Babilone)

Kyrie: “Lord haver mercy upon us” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 32, Tone I.1

Offertory Anthem: Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, I, by J.S. Bach

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: Lass dich nur nichts nich dauren, by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Communion Hymn: What wondrous love is this (Wondrous Love)

Recessional Hymn: Lift high the cross (Crucifer)

Closing Voluntary: Selections from Overture nach Französicher Art, BWV 831, by J.S. Bach



Sunday, March 6

The Fourth Sunday in Lent

 

~ Confirmation ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Concerto in Italiensichem Gusto (“Concerto in Italian Taste”), I., by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Guide me, O, thou great Jehovah (Cwm Rhondda)

Kyrie: “Lord haver mercy upon us” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 32, Tone III.4

Responsive Hymn: Like the murmur of a dove’s song (Bridegroom)

Offertory Anthem: Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing, arr. Douglas Buchanan, sung by the St. David’s Singers

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: My Faith Looks Up To Thee, Sung by the St. David’s Singers

Communion Hymn: Sing, my soul, his wondrous love (St. Bees)

Recessional Hymn: Amazing Grace (New Britain)

Closing Voluntary: Concerto in Italienischem Gusto, III. Presto, by J.S. Bach


Sunday, February 28

The Third Sunday in Lent

 

Opening Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, manualiter, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Lord, who throughout these forty days (St. Flavian)

Kyrie: “Lord haver mercy upon us” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 63:1-8, sung in Plainsong Tone II.1

Offertory Anthem: Jesus Walked this Lonesome Valley, traditional Spiritual, arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984), Sung by the Chorister Choir

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: Let thy merciful ears, O Lord, by Thomas Mudd (before 1619-1667)

Communion Hymn: Before thy throne, O God, we kneel (St. Petersburg)

Recessional Hymn: The glory of these forty days (Erhalt uns, Herr)

Closing Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach

The text of Jesus Walked this Lonesome Valley is one, primarily, of empathy: in contrast with the prayerful or self-effacing anthems heard thus far in Lent, this spiritual places us with Christ in the time of trial and temptation.

 

Jesus walked this lonesome valley,

He had to walk it for himself,

Nobody else could walk it for him,

He had to walk it for himself.

 

We must walk this lonesome valley,

We have to walk it for ourselves,

Nobody else can walk it for us,

We have to walk it for ourselves.

 

We must go to stand our trial,

We have to stand it for ourselves,

Nobody else can stand it for us,

We have to stand it for ourselves.

 

Thus, we think also on the origin of this Spiritual: sung by slaves who faced hardship and trials which are difficult to imagine. The work is sung today by the Chorister Choir, the children’s choir of the parish.

 

Thomas Mudd’s Let thy merciful ears, O Lord, asks that the “prayers of thy humble servants” may be heard, but not only that: the prayer is to make “thy humble servants…ask such things as shall please thee….” It is, ultimately, a prayer about prayer—the collect not only requests that the prayer be listened to, but that the penitent may learn how to pray, and what to ask—a fitting pairing with the Choristers’ anthem as we seek to live in greater empathy with those around us.

 

The organ voluntaries consist of the last in the Kyrie-Christe-Kyrie cycle that opens Bach’s Clavierübung III. The pedaliter chorale, “Lord God, Holy Ghost,” states the cantus firmus tune in the pedal—recall that the first Kyrie was in the topmost voice, representing God in Heaven, and the Christe chorale was in the middle voice, representing Christ between Heaven and Earth. This last in the cycle represents the Holy Ghost come down to Earth, represented in this last case by the low range of the pedal, emphasized by Bach’s indication that this setting is to be played pro organo pleno, “for the full organ.”

Sunday, February 21

The Second Sunday in Lent


Opening Voluntary: Christe, aller Welt Trost, manualiter, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: The God of Abraham praise (Leoni)

Kyrie: “Lord haver mercy upon us” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Psalm: Psalm 27, sung in Plainsong Tone VIII.1

Offertory Anthem: Ich hare des Herrn, from BWV 131, by J.S. Bach

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: Hear my prayer, O Lord, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Communion Hymn: Take my life and let it be (Hollingside)

Recessional Hymn: O love, how deep, how broad, how high (Deus tuorum militum)

Closing Voluntary: Christe, aller Welt Trost, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach


Bach’s Cantata 131, Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, is a partial setting of Psalm 130, “Out of the depths I cry to thee, O Lord.” The movement performed today, Ich hare des Herrn (“I wait upon the Lord, my soul waits, and I hope upon His word”) forms the middle choral movement of the work. It begins with a slow pronouncement and a sense of expectation before pushing forward into a fugue which seems to endlessly spiral through different keys. The fugue subject, stretched out, is accompanied by counterpoints that creates dissonances against it which, once resolved, create new dissonances in other parts (a “suspension chain”) that creates the sensation of perpetually being drawn forward, waiting, hoping.

Purcell’s brief but potent eight-part anthem Hear my prayer, O Lord, provides a similar effect, though here we feel more drawn forward in as chromatic notes and lead the music forward, pulling us towards the ultimate prayerful outburst which quickly subsides into silence.

The service is bookended by the second in the cycle of Bach’s Kyrie eleison-Christe eleison-Kyrie eleison organ chorales from the Clavierubung III (translated as “Christ, consoloation of all the world). In the pedaliter setting, the chorale tune (the cantus firmus) is stated in a middle voice (the first Kyrie chorale tune was stated in the soprano), which in Bach’s musical symbology would have been intended as imagery for Christ in our midst, between Heaven and Earth.



Sunday, February 14

The First Sunday in Lent

 

Opening Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott Vater in Ewigkeit, manualiter, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

At the Procession: The Great Litany

Psalm: Psalm 91: 1-2, 9-16, sung in Plainsong

Offertory Anthem: “Man that is born of a woman,” from Funeral Sentences, by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Doxology Hymn: As those of old their first fruits brought (Forest Green), v. 3

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: “Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts,” from Funeral Sentences by Henry Purcell

Recessional Hymn: Forty days and forty nights (Aus der Tiefe rufe ich)

Closing Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott Vater in Ewigkeit, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach

 

Throughout his life, Bach was interested in creating compendia—creating collections of material that represented the Parnasus of musical achievement. One of these collections was the Clavierübung series, or “keyboard workbooks.” It was common for leading composers of the Baroque to create such Clavierübungen as teaching tools for their students. Bach wrote four such books, the first two dealing with seemingly “earthly” matters (demonstrating mastery of international styles) and the latter two approaching matters more heavenly (the “Goldberg” variations, which has many allusions to Biblical numerology, is the fourth in this series). The third book of Bach’s Clavierübungen is known as the “German Organ Mass,” as it sets chorale preludes that work through the text and hymns of the mass. The first several chorale preludes form an extended Kyrie. In Lent, it is common to sing a Kyrie—Kyrie eleison, Christe eleison, Kyrie eleison (“Lord have mercy, Christ have mercy, Lord have mercy)—in place of the Gloria during worship. For the first three weeks in Lent, we will hear this opening progression of chorale preludes lead us through the first half of our Lenten journey.

 

This first week features the opening Kyrie, (“Lord, Father in Heaven”) set in two ways: first, a brief setting for manuals (keyboards) only, in a flowery, Baroque style. This would have been meant for individual devotional performance in a home with access to a harpsichord or clavichord. The other setting, pedaliter (with pedals), is in the stile antico, or “old style.” It is redolent of the compositional style of Palestrina: long, arcing lines with slower note values, with the cantus firmus, the original chorale tune, floating serenely on high.

 

The anthems for today are taken from Purcell’s setting of the Funeral Sentences, some of which were originally performed for the funeral of Queen Mary II of England. The slightly mournful and decidedly penitential feel of “Man that is born of a woman” offers a time to enter into the remorseful aspect of Lent; meanwhile, the homophonic (chorale-like) setting of “Thou knowest Lord” offers an entrée to the prayerful, renewing aspect of the season.


Wednesday, February 10

Ash Wednesday

 

Psalm: Psalm 103: 8-14, setting by Orlando Gibbons (Drop, drop slow tears contrafactum)

Gradual Hymn: Forty days and forty nights (Aus der Tiefe rufe ich)

At the Imposition of the Ashes: Psalm 51: 1-18, sung in Plainsong

Offertory Anthem: Ave Verum Corpus, by William Byrd (c. 1539-1623)

Offertory Hymn: Before thy throne, O God, we kneel (St. Petersburg)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Healey Willan, 1880-1968)

Fraction Anthem: “O Lamb of God” (Healey Willan)

Communion Anthem: Lord, make me to know thy ways, by William Byrd

Recessional Hymn: The glory of these forty days (Erhalt uns, Herr)

Closing Voluntary: Pavane, by William Byrd

 

The music of William Byrd is among the outstanding repertories of the English Renaissance. A Catholic amidst a Protestant government, Byrd had to balance his personal beliefs with his professional responsibilities. In sacred music, there was a practical rule with which he had to comply: an edict had been issued stating that vocal music should avoid overly melismatic writing (i.e., there could be only so many notes per syllable—unlike, say, Händel’s setting of “For unto us a child is bo-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-rn”). Under Protestant rule, he also set most of his music in English, as opposed to Latin, the official language of the Roman Catholic church. In addition to his sacred works, he also wrote works for keyboard—specifically the virginal—that were early pieces in the virtuoso tradition.

 

Tonight we hear a bit of music from each aspect of his life. To close, we hear a Pavane, a stately Renaissance dance with a somber, slightly funereal connotation. The material for this work is almost identical to that of the communion anthem, Lord, make me to know thy ways, which sets an English text according to the above rules of limited melismatic writing. The offertory anthem, however, is in Latin—curiously, though, it is also non-melismatic. This is likely because it was written for a performance in a house church by a small gathering of Catholics, worshipping in secret. One can imagine a hushed, intimate candlelit space where close friends gathered to sing. This personal message conveys a prayerful and contemplative attitude that serves as a fitting beginning to our journey through Lent.


Sunday, February 7

The Last Sunday After the Epiphany


Opening Voluntary: Partita on Alle Menschen müssen stebern (Salzburg) by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)

Processional Hymn: O wondrous type, O vision fair (Wareham)

Gloria: “Glory to You,” by John Rutter (b. 1945)

Gradual: Psalm 99, setting by Ivor Algernon Atkins (1869-1953)

Offertory Anthem: Israel hoffe auf den Herrn, from Cantata 131, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Offertory Hymn: Songs of thankfulness and praise (Salzburg)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Richard Proulx, 1937-2010)

Communion Anthem: Lead me, Lord, by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Communion Hymn: Humbly I adore thee (Adoro devote)

Recessional Hymn: Alleluia, sing to Jesus (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary: Alle Menschen müseen sterben (Salzburg) by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)


Sunday, January 31

Festival Eucharist for the Fourth Sunday after the Epiphany

and

The Annual Meeting of the Parish

 

Opening Voluntary: Prelude in C Major, BWV 531 by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven (Lauda Anima), with the St. David’s Ringers

Gloria: “Glory to You,” by John Rutter (b. 1945)

Gradual: Psalm 19, Sung in Simplified Anglican Chant by the St. David’s Singers

Offertory Anthem: With a Voice of Singing, by Martin Shaw (1875-1958, sung by the St. David’s Singers

Offertory Hymn: O Christ, the Word incarnate (Munich)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Richard Proulx, 1937-2010)

Communion Anthem: The Heavens above declare God’s praise, from the Scottish Psalter, sung by the St. David’s Singers

Communion Hymn: My God, thy table now is spread (Morning Song)

Recessional Hymn: Love divine, all loves excelling (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary: Fugue in C Major, BWV 531, by J.S. Bach


Sunday, January 24

~ Services cancelled due to blizzard ~


Sunday, January 17

The Second Sunday After the Epiphany

and

Commemoration of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Opening Voluntary: Petit Prelude, by Joseph Jongen (1873-1953)

Processional Hymn: I want to walk as a child of the light (I want to walk)

Gloria: “Glory to You,” by John Rutter (b. 1945)

Gradual: Psalm 36: 5-10, setting by John Joubert (b. 1927)

Offertory Anthem: Ride On, King Jesus, African-American Spiritual arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Hymn: All praise to you, O Lord (Carlisle)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Richard Proulx, 1937-2010)

Communion Anthem: Steal Away, African-American Spiritual arr. Douglas Buchanan

Communion Hymn: Oh holy city, seen of John (Morning Song)

Recessional Hymn: In Christ there is no East or West (McKee)

Closing Voluntary: Marches Nuptual, by Louis Vierne (b. 1870-1937)


~ The Service of Evensong ~


Prelude Recital, performed by Tariq Al-Sabir, tenor

    Precious Lord (traditional)

    To be Young, Gifted, and Black, by Nina Simone (1933-2003)

    Blowin’ in the Wind, by Bob Dylan (b. 1941)

    We Shall Overcome (traditional)

Processional Hymn: In Christ there is no East or West (McKee)

Preces and Responses: Tariq Al-Sabir (b. 1993), World Premiere, Commissioned by St. David’s

Phos Hilaron: Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)

Gradual: Psalm 98: 1-4, setting by David Hurd (b. 1950)

Canticles: Thomas Morley (fauxbourdon) (1557-1602)

Anthem: Excerpts from Rise, by Judah Adashi (b. 1975)

Recessional Hymn: Lift every voice and sing (Lift Every Voice)

Closing Voluntary: Improvisation on We Shall Overcome, Douglas Buchanan


Sunday, January 10

The First Sunday after the Epiphany


Opening Voluntary: How brightly shines the Morningstar, by Dietrich Buxtehude

Processional Hymn: What star is this with beams so bright

Offertory Anthem: What cheer?by William Walton

Offertory Hymn: The sinless one to Jordan came

Communion Anthem: Tantum ergo, by Sydney Nicholson

Communion Hymn: Like the murmur of a dove's song

Recessional Hymn: Brightest and best of the stars of the morning

Closing Voluntary: Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam, by J.S. Bach


~ Choral Hiatus December 7 and January 3 ~


Thursday, December 24

~ The Eve of the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ ~


~ A Prelude of Carols ~

(beginning at 9:30)

Hodie, Christus natus est (Roman Rite Chant)

A Child is Born in Bethlehem, by Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654), arr. David Wilcocks (1919-2015)

Ding dong! Merrily on high, arr. David Wilcocks

Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?, arr. David Wilcocks

Bogoroditsye Dyevo (“Virgin Mother of God”), by Arvo Pärt (b. 1935)

A Virgin Unspotted, by William Billings (1746-1800)

A Great and Mighty Wonder, music by Michael Praetorius (1571-1621), arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Blessed be that Maid Mairie, by Douglas Buchanan

In Dulci Jubilo, by Robert Lucas de Pearsall (1795-1856)

 

Opening Voluntary: Three settings of In Dulci Jubilo

 …in double canon (at the ninth, and in inversion) , by Douglas Buchanan

 …as a dance, by Marcel Dupré (1866-1971)

 …in double canon (at the octave), by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

 Processional Hymn: Once in royal David’s city (Irby)

Gloria: Angles we have heard on high (Gloria)

Psalm: Psalm 96, sung in Anglican chant, setting by David Hurd (b. 1950)

At the Procession of the Gospel: O Come, All Ye Faithful (Adeste Fidelis)

Offertory Anthem: Hodie a 8, by G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)

Offertory Hymn: Lo, how a Rose e’er blooming (Es ist ein Ros’)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias, b. 1934)

Communion Anthem: Jesus Christ the Apple Tree, by Elizabeth Poston (1905-1987)

Communion Hymn: What child is this (Greensleeves)

Postcommunion Hymn: Silent night, holy night (Stille Nacht)

Recessional Hymn: Hark! the herald-angels sing (Mendelssohn)

Closing Voluntary: Final, from Symphony no. 1, by Louis Vierne (1870-1937)


Sunday, December 20

The Fourth Sunday in Advent

~ A Service of Lessons and Carols ~

 

Opening Voluntary: Improvisation on O Come, O Come Emmanuel, by Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Introit: Advent Matin Responsory, by G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)

Processional Hymn: O come, O come, Emmanuel (v. 1-6) (Veni, veni, Emmanuel)

After the First Lesson: Creator of the stars of night (Conditor alme siderum)

After the Second Lesson: Adam lay yBounden, by Boris Ord (1897-1961)

After the Third Lesson: People, look East (v. 1,2, 4) (Besançon)

After the Fourth Lesson: O Thou, the Central Orb, by Charles Wood (1866-1926)

After the Fifth Lesson: Lo, how a Rose e’er blooming (v. 1-2) (Es ist ein Ros)

After the Sixth Lesson: The angel Gabriel from heaven came (Gabriel’s Message)

After the Seventh Lesson: Bogoroditsye Dyevo (“Virgin Mother of God”), by Arvo Pärt (b. 1935)

After the Eighth Lesson: Rorate Coeli (“Drop down, ye heavens”), by Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901)

After the Ninth Lesson: O come, all ye faithful (v. 1-3)

Offertory Anthem: Blessed be that Maid Mairie, by Douglas Buchanan

Offertory Hymn: From all that dwell below the skies (Old 100th)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (David Hurd, b. 1950)

Communion Anthem: Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?, French trad. arr. David Wilcocks (1919-2015)

Recessional Hymn: Lo! He comes, with clouds descending (Helmsley)

Closing Voluntary: Toccata on Veni, veni, by Adolphus Hailstork (b. 1941)


Sunday, December 13

The Third Sunday in Advent

Opening Voluntary: “Canticle,” from Folkloric Suite, by Jean Langlais (1907-1991)

Processional Hymn: Sleepers wake! a voice astounds us (Wachet auf)

Trisagion: “Holy God” (Alexander Arkangelsky, b. 1846-1924)

Gradual: Canticle 9, fauxbourdon setting arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Anthem: “And he shall purify,” from Messiah, by G.F. Händel (1685-1759)

Offertory Hymn: Hark the glad sound! The savior comes (Richmond)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (David Hurd, b. 1950)

Communion Anthem: Surge illuminare, by William Byrd (d. 1623)

Communion Hymn: Watchman, tell us of the night (Aberystwyth)

Recessional Hymn: Prepare the way, O Zion (Bereden väg för Herren)

Closing Voluntary: “Canzona,” from Folkloric Suite, by Jean Langlais



Sunday, December 6

The Second Sunday in Advent

Opening Voluntary: Chorale with 4 variations on Freud dich sehr, o meine Seele (“Comfort, Comfort ye my people”), by Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706)

Processional Hymn: Comfort, comfort ye my people (Psalm 42)

Trisagion: “Holy God” (Alexander Arkangelsky, 1846-1924)

Gradual: Canticle 16, fauxbourdon setting arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Anthem: Benedictus in C, by Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)

Offertory Hymn: On Jordan’s bank the baptist’s cry (Winchester New)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (David Hurd, b. 1950)

Communion Anthem: Fuit missus a Deo, by G.P. da Palestrina (c. 1525-1594)

Communion Hymn: There’s a voice in the wilderness crying (Ascension)

Recessional Hymn: Hark! A thrilling a voice is sounding (Merton)

Closing Voluntary: On Jordan’s Bank, by Aaron David Miller (b. 1972)


The second Sunday in Advent focuses on John the Baptist, and particularly his fulfillment of the prophecy of Isaiah (and chosen by Händel to open his Messiah): “Comfort ye, my people…Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God.” Musically, we hear this message first in our processional hymn, preceded by a chorale partita written by Pachelbel.


The title “partita” (literally, “parts”) has various applications in the Baroque era. When used in reference to a chorale tune (here, Pachelbel is referencing a different text, Psalm 42 in the Geneva Psalter, where we receive the tune name for our opening hymn, albeit with a few rhythmic differences), it suggests a piece with several variations—usually textural—upon the given cantus firmus (“fixed song,” i.e., the chorale tune). The first variation presents rapid passagework—scales and arpeggios—in the bass line; the second variation mixes the passage work between the lowest and the middle voices—and the third variation brings the passagework into the upper voice; finally, the last variation states the chorale tune in the bass voice with joyful leaps above. This textural workmanship—allowing a rapid texture to effervesce from the lowest registers to the highest, and eventually inverting the placement of the chorale—is a common device in the Baroque era. It has a resonance, though with the message of Isaiah, of John, and of Advent. In addition to being a time of preparation in our hearts and minds, it is also a time of inversions and reversals: throughout Advent (indeed, throughout the entirely of the Bible), power is given to the powerless, and humility is instilled in the mighty. A worthy message indeed for our world.


Stanford’s Benedictus in C is an anthem setting of today’s Canticle. Canticles are poetic texts from the Bible, frequently sung in place of psalms. (Here, the canticle placement is entitled a “gradual” as psalms and canticles were often chanted on the gradus, the steps, of the chancel. Palestrina’s rarely performed Fuit missus a Deo is a setting of the text “There was a man sent from God,” realized in his ever-flowing style that was seen by many as the culmination of Italianate Renaissance vocal polyphony could be. The closing voluntary, On Jordan’s Bank, is a setting of the alternate tune to be sung to this hymn text, Puer Nobis, written by Minnesotan organist and composer Aaron Miller. It takes the form of a (somewhat caffeinated) Baroque ritornello form, travelling through different key areas while bringing back the ritornello, or “return,” of the introductory material mixed with the hymn tune, ending rapturously with fanfares that echo John’s words.


Sunday, November 29

The First Sunday in Advent 

Opening Voluntary: Nun komm der Heiden Heiland, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

At the Procession: The Great Litany

Trisagion: “Holy God” (Alexander Arkangelsky, 1846-1924)

Psalm: Psalm 25:1-9, fauxbourdon setting arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Anthem: O Thou, the Central Orb, by Charles Wood (1866-1926)

Offertory Hymn: Savior of the Nations Come (Nun komm der Heiden Heiland)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (David Hurd, b. 1950)

Communion Anthem: Rorate Coeli, by Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901)

Communion Hymn: Rejoice! Rejoice believers (Llangloffan)

Recessional Hymn: Come, thou long-expected Jesus (Stuttgart)

Closing Voluntary: Nun komm der Heiden Heiland, by Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621)

 

As a season of preparation and as the beginning of the new liturgical year, musical selections for Advent frequently strike a different tone than the jubilant (and sometimes apocalyptic!) anthems and hymns sung as we were nearing Christ the King Sunday. There is at once a sensation of joy to come, yet also the knowledge of the hard work to prepare our world and our hearts for the coming (adveniens) of divine love.

 

This shift in tone begins immediately: following the triumphant march of last Sunday’s voluntary, we begin with a miniature chorale prelude by Bach from his Orgelbüchlein (“Little Organ Book”). The chosen chorale is “Savior of the Nations Come” (in German, Nun komm der Heiden Heiland); here, a single stanza is set with interweaving counterpoint based on the tune’s opening motive (step down, leap up, step down) in all its possible variants. Particularly prevalent are the dissonant leaps that are present in the setting. In German Baroque musical rhetoric, these would be called saltus duriusculus, or “hard leaps.” These were used to lend a sense of gravity; Bach also uses them in his setting of Durch Adams fall (“Through Adams fall”) to portray sin in musical imagery. Sudden reductions of texture in the miniature setting draw our attention to a sensation of musical anticipation, meant to capture the anticipation of Christ’s coming to wash away sin and death.

 

This anticipatory and reverential tone continues with the singing of the Great Litany, an extended plainsong chant with congregational responses that is one of the most revered forms of communal sung prayer in the Anglican communion. Plainsong also serves as the basis of our psalm-singing in Advent. To mark the shift in mood, we change from singing the Anglican-chant-style of psalmody to a fauxbourdon style. Fauxbourdon (or “false bass”) originated from the interactions of French and English musicians in the 15th century and takes slightly different forms in these different regions. By the time of the English Renaissance, a typical fauxbourdon setting would involve a plainsong tone with a simple harmonization, frequently emphasizing strings of “sweet-sounding” parallel sixths and thirds.


The service closes with another setting of Nun komm der Heiden Heiland, this time by Dutch composer J.P. Sweelinck. Sweelinck’s setting takes the hymn tune and presents it in the upper most voice in long, drawn-out notes (a cantus firmus, or “fixed song”) with active figuration underneath.

 

Sunday, November 22

The Twenty-Fifth Sunday Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 29)

~ “Christ the King” Sunday ~

Opening Voluntary: “Spitfire Prelude,” from The First and the Few, by William Walton (1902-1983)

Processional Hymn: All hail the power of Jesus’ name (Diademata)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (Robert Powell, b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 93, setting by George Elvey (1741-1790)

Offertory Anthem: Te Deum, by Gustav Holst (1874-1934)

Offertory Hymn: Holy spirit, ever living (Abbot’s Leigh)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Robert Powell)

Communion Anthem: Tantum ergo, by Sydney Nicholson (1875-1947)

Communion Hymn: Let all mortal flesh keep silence (Picardy)

Recessional Hymn: Crown him with many crowns (Lauda anima)

Closing Voluntary: Orb and Scepter (Coronation March) by William Walton


The Te Deum text (“To you, O God”) is one of the canticles used in liturgies of morning prayer. It also contains imagery of a kingly Christ, arrayed in splendor, and thus a perfect fit for the last Sunday after Pentecost, frequently celebrated as “Christ the King Sunday.” This feast day literally and figuratively “crowns” the church year—it is the final Sunday of the liturgical cycle, before the new liturgical year begins with the first Sunday of Advent. Much of the music for today is regal and jubilant. William Walton, famous for his coronation marches (including the Crown Imperial, performed on this day last year), was adept at writing lively and invigorating incidental and occasional music. This Sunday, we hear both: first, music from the film The First and the Few, and second, the coronation march Orb and Scepter. The carry with them the spirit of Elgar’s marches, including Pomp and Circumstance, with a sense of restrained joy that adds to their regal bearing.


Holst’s Te Deum makes use of a nigh-omnipresent halo of sound, an undulating set of sextuplets that brightly enlivens the chant-like (though quite boisterous) setting of the text. The setting also makes use of colorful harmonic changes within an overall modal context, a common element of the English choral tradition in the early 20th century. Sydney Nicholson’s communion motet Tantum Ergo balances the energy of the offertory anthem with a contemplative spinning-out of chant lines, altering them slightly throughout the work to create a major-mode version of the traditional chant, lifting prayerfully upwards.


Sunday, November 15

The Twenty-Fifth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 28)

Opening Voluntary: Andante sostenuto, from Three Quiet Preludes, by Frederick Jacobi (1891-1952)

Processional Hymn: Hail to the Lord’s anointed (Es flog ein kleins Waldvögelein)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (Robert Powell, b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 16

Offertory Anthem: How Can I Keep From Singing?, arr. Douglas Buchanan (b. 1984)

Offertory Hymn: Come thou fount of every blessing (Nettleton)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Robert Powell)

Communion Anthem: My Lord, What a Morning, arr. Douglas Buchanan

Communion Hymn: Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love (Chereponi)

Recessional Hymn: Jerusalem my happy home (Land of Rest)

Closing Voluntary: Toccata, by Eugene Gigout (1844-1925)

 

The anthems for this Sunday are arranged from American sources and performed by the St. David’s Singers, the volunteer choir of the parish. Of the two, My Lord, What a Morning is likely the better known, an African-American Spiritual that in some sources written as My Lord, What a Mourning, a play on the fact that the text is apocalyptic: “My Lord, what a mo(u)rning, when the stars begin to fall: you’ll hear the trumpet sound to wake the nations underground.” Earth-shattering though it may be, it fits perfectly with this week’s Gospel: “all will be thrown down…nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be earthquakes in various places….”

 

When one arranges music from a tradition that is not one's own, it is above all important to be aware and respectful of the culture from which it originates. In this arrangement, the strophic nature of the source music is retained (“strophic” means the singing of the same music to different words, as in the verses of a hymn), with expression being added through dynamics and variations in texture, similar to many spirituals which display a call-and-response format. The refrain also utilizes chromaticism derived from the Blues scale, a reference which pays homage to the enduring influence of African-American music-making throughout the 19th and 20th and into the 21st century. A modern-day interpretation of the text can be seen as a call to justice (particularly in Baltimore where we must confront the conflicting histories of race and privilege in our community): “You’ll hear the Christian shout to wake the nations underground” can be a message to us to commit to commit to the words sung in the hymn Chereponi, “Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love, show us how to serve the neighbors we have in you.”

 

The offertory anthem was written by Robert Lowry (though is frequently attributed as a Quaker hymn—the Quakers later adopted it) and is as much a song of praise as it is a hymn of renewal (“My life goes on in endless song, amidst earth’s lamentation I hear the sweet though far-off hymn that hails a new creation”). The setting  first features women singing the melody, then men, and culminates in an a capella statement that illumines the final verse (perhaps reminiscent of the falling stars in My Lord, What a Morning): “I lift my eyes, the cloud grows thin, I see the blue above it…” The arrangement ends in a coda formed by a close canon between the three voice parts (soprano, alto, and baritone), a musical representation of this ever-flowing song.

 

The service closes with Gigot’s famous Toccata, a suitably ethereal work to go along with the celestial anthems (paving the way, ultimately, for Christ the King Sunday). The toccata is a study in texture, growing from a small minor third motive and elaborating it with continually changing filigree, growing to a final, driving section and a climactic final cadence.


Sunday, November 8

The Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 27)

~ Ingathering Sunday ~

Opening Voluntary: “Prière à Notre-Dame,” from Suite Gothique by Léon Boëlmann (1862-1897)

Processional Hymn: God of grace, and God of glory (Cwm Rhondda)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (Robert Powell, b. 1932)

Psalm: Psalm 146, setting by Thomas Norris (1741-1790)

Offertory Anthem: “Gloria,” from Missa Brevis in D Major, by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)

Offertory Hymn: From all that dwell below the skies (Old Hundredth)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (Robert Powell)

Communion Anthem: “Agnus Dei,” from Missa Brevis in D Major, by W.A. Mozart

Communion Hymn: Blest are the pure in heart (Franconia)

Recessional Hymn: Praise my soul the king of heaven (Lauda anima)

Closing Voluntary: “Toccata,” from Suite Gothique by Léon Boëlmann (1685-1750)


In the Medieval era, Gothic architecture became the norm for massive structures and edifices which had cultural or religious importance, particularly houses of state and cathedrals. The ornate layers, flying buttresses, and grand towers proclaimed the craftsman’s—and, for the religious, God’s—handiwork (as well as the purchaser’s import in the community). The musical corollary to Gothic architecture was polyphony. Medieval church music witnessed a turn from simple, semi-improvisatory chants towards those utilizing multiple voices (a process called organum) and, further, being recorded in early notation. Thus, the concept of a written “piece” and a piece’s composer took greater shape in the cultural consciousness.


The locus for this activity is the Cathedral of Notre-Dame, which Boëllman references (albeit indirectly) in his “Gothic Suite,” III, “The Prayer of Our Lady.” Here, Boëllman—a French composer from the 19th century—touches on his countrymen’s efforts from 600 years prior.

Traversing between polyphony (many voices) and homophony (melody-and-accompaniment) has long been a balancing act of many composers, from Palestrina to Bach and beyond. Few accomplish this with greater panache than W.A. Mozart. In his Missa Brevis in D Major—of which we hear the Gloria and Agnus Dei today, identified in the last year as congregational favorites—Mozart not crafts effervescent accompaniment, operatic solo work, and intricate ensemble work. The closing “amen” of the Gloria, for instance, builds up, one syncopated entrance at a time, like a fireworks display building to a grand finale.


This sort of humorous musical treatment is brought back in the Agnus Dei: following a prayerful first section (“Lamb of God, have mercy upon us”) in which the soloists lead the supplications in B Minor, we enter the bright, sunny tonic of D Major for the closing dona nobis pacem (“grant us peace”). The dona nobis takes the form of a rondo, alternating between a refrain (heard first in the soloist) and episodes which take (sometimes) humorous turns: one introduces a Baroque fugue, the other jumps in the parallel minor; each displays a different facet of Mozart’s musical personality, which inherently is tied up in his treatment of polyphony. This meditation on “many voices” is particularly important this week on Ingathering Sunday, as we come together to offer our pledges of support, many voices raised in unity to lift up our community, and thereby our prayers and good works for the world.


Sunday, November 1

The Twenty-Third Sunday Sunday after Pentecost

~ All Saints ~

Opening Voluntary: Psalm-Prelude No. 2, from Set 2 (“Yea, there is no darkness with thee”) by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

Processional Hymn: For all the saints (Sine Nomine), accompanied by the Handbell Choir

Psalm: Psalm 24, setting by George Thalben-Ball (1896-1987)

Offertory Anthem: And I Saw a New Heaven, by Edgar Bainton (1880-1956)

Offertory Hymn: I sing a song of the saints of God (Grand Isle)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” by Robert Powell (b. 1932)

Communion Anthem: Justorum Animae, by William Byrd (c. 1539-1623)

Communion Hymn: I heard the voice of Jesus say (The Third Tune)

Recessional Hymn: Ye watchers and ye holy ones (Lasst uns erfreuen)

Closing Voluntary: Carillon de Westminster, by Louis Vierne (1870-1937)


Sunday, October 25

The Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 25)

Opening Voluntary: "Prelude-Chorale," from Suite Gothique by Leon Boëllmann (1862-1897)

Processional Hymn: O bless the Lord, my soul (St. Thomas)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 126, setting by C.V. Stanford (1852-1894)

Offertory Anthem: Sing Ye Rightoues, by Lodovico Viadana (1560-1627)

Offertory Hymn: O for a thousand tongues to sing (Azmon)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Almighty and everlasting God, by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Communion Hymn: I'll praise my maker while I've breath (Old 113th)

Recessional Hymn: When in our music God is glorified (Engelberg)

Closing Voluntary: "Menuet Gothique" from Suite Gothique by Leon Boëllmann



Sunday, October 18

The Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 24)

Opening Voluntary: Sheep may Safely Grace, by J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Processional Hymn: Spread, O spread thou mighty word (St. Anne)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 91:1-6, setting by John Goss (1800-1880)

Offertory Anthem: "But as for his people," from Israel in Egypt, by G.F. Händel (1685-1759)

Offertory Hymn: O love of God, how strong and true (Dunedin)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: O Sacrum Convivium, by Marc-Antoine Charpentier (c. 1643-1704)

Communion Hymn: Draw nigh and take the body of the Lord (Song 46)

Recessional Hymn: Hail thou once despised Jesus (In Babilone)

Closing Voluntary: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba," from Solomon, by G.F. Händel

“But as for his people, he led them forth like sheep; he brought them forth with silver and gold.”

 

This text provides the basis for Händel’s choral movement from his massive oratorio Israel in Egypt. Oratorios were a popular form of entertainment in the 18th century when theatres were strapped for cash—because the productions were non- or semi-staged, impresarios could still produce a musically engaging event without paying for sets, crew, or costumes. Händel seized on this format, bringing his musical background to bear—a background that involved German and Italian schooling, ensuring a firm grounding both in counterpoint and engaging vocal writing—in his grand oratorios. The piece we hear at the offertory, But as for his people, describes the Israelite’s departure from Egypt; the “silver and gold” is the sun reflecting off the waters of the sea and the mountaintops. Always the effective musical illustrator, Händel utilizes three main ideas in this chorus: a fanfare texture that draws attention to the action (“But as for his people”); a lilting, pastoral rhythm emphasizing the subdominant harmony (a major harmony built on the fourth scale degree of a scale frequently used to give a settled, pastoral sensibility) setting “he led them forth like sheep;” and an extended fugato passage for “he brought them forth with silver and gold.” Here, the setting “shines;” the word “gold” is set with faster, glistening eighth notes, handing off the melodic attention to the entrance of the next voice, and the next, and the next, until all voices are “following” the music towards a place of safe arrival.

 

The other text frequently sung at this liturgy (Proper 24 B, with its inclusion of Isaiah 53) is from Händel’s most famous oratorio, Messiah, namely the choral movement “Surely he hath born our griefs.” The Isaiah passage calls to mind the Passion narrative: “like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth.” In the German Baroque (the style of which is infused into Händel’s writing, despite his international travels) involved an emphasis on rhetoric. One rhetorical device frequently used in such compositions was thesis-antithesis, the resulting tension between the two resulting in a synthesis. Though much of today’s lectionary readings emphasize the ultimate sacrifice of Christ, our psalm, anthems, and other music suggest safe passage, for instance, in Händel’s anthem, or in Bach’s chorale-prelude (“Sheep may safely graze”), or the psalm setting (“Because he is bound to me in love, therefore will I deliver him; I will protect him, because he knows my Name.”) By holding these two ideas in tension—the sacrifice and the safety—the salvific potential of Christ’s sacrifice is revealed.

Sunday, October 11

The Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 23)

Opening Voluntary: Carillon de Chateau-Thiery, by Seth Bingham (1882-1972)

Processional Hymn: O God, our help in ages past (St. Anne)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 90:12-17, setting by David Hurd (b. 1950)

Offertory Anthem: Teach me, O Lord, by William Byrd (c. 1540-1623)

Offertory Hymn: Be thou my vision (Slane)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Give almes of thy goods, by Christopher Tye (c. 1505-1573)

Communion Hymn: Take my life and let it be (Hollingside)

Recessional Hymn: Alleluia! Sing to Jesus (Hyfrydol)

Closing Voluntary: Carillon, by Edward Elgar (1857-1934)


The lectionary this week is filled with prayers for guidance, supplications for wisdom and law. In Amos, we are reminded to “seek good and not evil;” the Psalm ask: “teach us to number our days;” the letter to the Hebrews reminds us that “[we] know the commandments;” and the Gospel of Mark echoes this sentiment, following which Jesus also cautions the rich man that it would be easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than to pass through the gates of heaven.

Much of this week’s music, then, are appeals for assistance and wisdom, either for ourselves, or in ways in which we may be of assistance to others. The offertory anthem is William Byrd’s Teach me, O Lord, a verse anthem that raises up a plea to understand the commandments: “Teach me, O Lord, the way of thy statutes, that I may keep them to the end.” A verse anthem was a frequent device of English Renaissance composers, who would set portions of the text for soloists or semi-chorus (a small part of the chorus), followed by the full chorus, often responding in refrain. This gives the music an exciting, call-and-response texture. At the communion, we hear Christopher Tye’s setting of Give almes of thy goods, reminding us that in giving, we receive, and invite the face of God upon ourselves as well as our fellow human beings.

We sing these themes, together, as well, in the opening hymn “O God, our help in ages past,” reminding us of divine guidance throughout generations, as well as within our own lives. This last is sung together in our communion hymn: “Take my life and let it be / consecrated, Lord to thee.”

Just as the hymns and anthems ask for wisdom to follow God’s law, the opening and closing voluntaries follow a “law” of their own. They are each “carillons,” pieces inspired by English change-ringing in bell towers, where a set number of bells are rung in a rotating series of pitches. All the notes are kept the same throughout (the “law” in this metaphor) but the pattern or surrounding harmonies will shift subtly, creating a kaleidoscope of notes that center around a single idea, as the music and prayers this week center around the law of the Lord.


~ Sunday, October 4 ~

The Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 22)

Opening Voluntary: Let all things now living, by David Cherwein (b. 1957)

Processional Hymn: Joyful, joyful, we adore thee (Hymn to Joy)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 8

Offertory Anthem: For the Beauty of the Earth, arr. Douglas Buchanan

            Sung by the Chorister Choir,

with Lisa Perry, piano, and Kelly Buchanan, flute

Offertory Hymn: Lord, make us servants of your peace (Dickinson College)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: For the Beauty of the Earth, by John Rutter

Communion Hymn: Deck thyself, my soul, with gladness (Schmücke dich)

Recessional Hymn: All hail the power of Jesus’ Name! (Coronation)

Closing Voluntary: Prelude and Fugue in F, by Dietrich Buxtehude (c. 1637-1707)

 

“Let all things now living,

A prayer of thanksgiving,

To God our creator abundantly raise.”

 

So begins the hymn tune which David Cherwein chooses for his chorale prelude, a spritely setting we hear this week as our opening voluntary. The hymn serves as an apt opening for the first Sunday of October, when the life of St. Francis is typically celebrated. In a world sundered by greed, a planet ravaged by misuse, and with nations (including our own) rocked by violence and injustice, St. Francis’ fervent message of peace could not be more timely.

 

St. Francis’ love of the natural world is expressed in several settings of the hymn text For the Beauty of the Earth. Our first encounter with these words is a traditional setting sung frequently in Protestant churches, featuring the Chorister Choir’s first performance of the season. The choir is accompanied today by St. David’s soprano Lisa Perry, and flute played by St. David’s alto Kelly Buchanan. The second setting is by John Rutter, his syncopations adding a sense of energy that, while potentially slightly pop-y, is nonetheless deeply felt.

 

The prayer “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace,” the words of St. Francis which are likely most well known, is sung congregationally: this is an important moment, a moment when we can dedicate ourselves—in solidarity with our neighbors—to create a more just, peaceful, and verdant world.


~ Sunday, September 27 ~

The Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 21)

Opening Voluntary: Allegro, from Toccata, by Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725)

Processional Hymn: The God of Abraham praise (Leoni)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest” (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 19, v. 7-14, setting by Orlando Gibbons (1582-1625) (Drop, drop slow tears contrafactum)

Offertory Anthem: Die Himmel erzählen, by Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672)

Offertory Hymn: Where cross the crowded ways of life (Gardiner)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: O Sacrum Convivium, by Edward Elgar (1857-1934)

Communion Hymn: O food to pilgrims given (O Welt, ich muss dich lassen)

Recessional Hymn: Praise my soul, the King of Heaven (Lauda anima)

Closing Voluntary: Fuga, from Toccata, by Alessandro Scarlatti

Psalm-singing is one of the most ancient practices of the Judeo-Christian tradition, and is one of the great unifying rituals tying these two faiths together. The tradition of chanting psalms, then, is truly ancient. The methods by which such psalms are sung have necessarily changed over thousands of years as cultures write and re-write their methods for singing them. One of the styles of psalm-singing most common to the Anglican tradition is that of Anglican Chant, wherein a sequence of ten chords is used (grouped in patterns of four and six) to move through each verse of text. Sometimes this pattern is extended two fold to move through two verses of text; this is known as a double chant. This week, we hear a contrafactum (a musical setting where two texts are exchanged) of Gibbons’ Drop, Drop Slow Tears, the chord progression used to illumine the text of the second half of Psalm 19, as appointed by the lectionary.


The first half of Psalm 19 is heard at the offertory in a setting for six voice parts (two sopranos, alto, two tenors, bass) by Heinrich Schütz. The text of Psalm 19 (“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shows his handiwork”) certainly lends itself to musical depiction, which Schütz achieves marvelously. Schütz studied in Venice with Giovanni Gabrieli, music director at San Marco. The church is notable for its multiple galleries from which choristers and instrumentalists could resound, creating a polychoral or antiphonal effect wherein different choirs would sound against each other from diverse spaces. Much of Schütz’s music builds on this effect, even when only a single choir is in use. To demonstrate certain verses of Psalm 19, Schütz will pit high voices against low. In our current arrangement, the men sing “one day tells its tale to another,” and the women sing “and one night imparts knowledge to another.” Exciting text-painting is also used, as the phrase “in alle Lände” (“throughout all lands”) is passed imitatively throughout all parts. The opening homophonic texture (“same-sound,” e.g., hymns or songs with melody-and-accompaniment) returns at several intervals throughout the work like pillars to hold it up. Notably, it is used to set the doxology at the end, this beginning music heard with the text: “Wie es war im Anfang, jetzt, und immerdar,” or “as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be.” This type of construction—using the opening material to set the doxology that references beginning, present time, and eternity—becomes a common feature of psalm-singing, particularly in the German Baroque, used by Schütz and eventually by J.S. Bach (one notable example is in the last movement of his Magnificat).

The complexity of Schütz’s setting is offset by the meditative setting of the Eucharistic text O Sacrum Convivium (“O Sacred Feast”) by Edward Elgar, and the filigreed Toccata of Alessandro Scarlatti, an inheritor of a (here now notably lighter) Italianate style that Giovanni Gabrielli—and Heinrich Schütz—played a part.


~ Sunday, September 20 ~

The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 20)

Opening Voluntary: Cantabile, by Joseph Jongen (1873-1953)

Processional Hymn: How firm a foundation (Lyons)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 54, setting arranged by Douglas Buchanan based on the hymn tune St. Anne

Offertory Anthem: Rejoice in the Lord alway, anonymous 16th century

Offertory Hymn: O Love, how deep, how high (Deus tuorum militum)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Verily, verily I say unto thee, by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585)

Communion Hymn: O Master, let me walk with thee (Maryton)

Recessional Hymn: Sing ye faithful (Finnian)

Closing Voluntary: Fanfare, by Virgil Thomson (1896-1989)

 

This Sunday features two choral works exemplifying different aspects of the Renaissance Anglican choral style, Rejoice in the Lord alway, by an anonymous composer of the 16th century, and Verily, verily I say unto thee Thomas Tallis. Rejoice in the Lord is a praise anthem beginning with imitative counterpoint: a melodic line (in this case, based around an ascending perfect fourth, an annunciative and fanfare-like sound, perhaps suggesting a tie-in with today’s closing organ voluntary) is repeated at different intervals in several parts. This develops into a crescendo as more voices join, until entrances occur on almost every beat of the measure: a multitude of praise.

 

This polyphonic—“many sounds/voices”—style was quite common in Renaissance English music, in choral writing a well as in secular consort and dance music. It lent a sense of majesty, complexity, and richness to the text or melody by spinning it out and demonstrating contrapuntal know-how.

 

Another style of writing was the homophonic—“same sound”—style, in which text was presented in a hymn-like fashion, made up of voices moving in block chords in fairly homogenous rhythms. This style is exemplified in many of Thomas Tallis’ English-language works. This is partially because, in the early days of the Anglican church, laws existed against overly melismatic music—music in which a single syllable was set to many notes, like the word “born” in “For unto us a Child is born” in Händel’s Messiah—because these made the music sound too “Catholic.” In Verily, verily, Tallis puts the homophonic style to great effect, creating mystical statements, sometimes energetic (“and I shall raise them up on the last day”) and sometimes quietly internalized (“for my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.”) Though no dynamics exist in the score, the texture, range, and harmonic and melodic motion can hint at possible interpretations that bring out the mystical aspect of this work.

 

~ Sunday, September 20 ~

Evensong for the Eve of St. Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist

 

Pre-Service Recital:

Charm City Baroque and Kerry Holahan, Soprano


Pièces de clavecin avec voix ou violon, Op. 5, by Jean-Joesph de Mondonville (1711-1772)

Sonata in A minor for violin and continuo, op. 5, no. 7 (selections) by Jean-Marie Leclair (1697-1764)

The Lover’s Recantation: A Cantata, by Thomas Arne (1710-1778)

 

The Service of Evensong


Processional Hymn: O Lord and Father of mankind (Repton)

Preces and Responses: Willaim Smith (c. 1603-1645)

Phos Hilaron: O Gracious Light, setting by Thomas Tallis (The Eighth Tune)

Psalm: Psalm 34, by Thomas Norris (1741-1790)

Canticles: Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Anthem: Abendlied, by Josef Rheinberger (1872-1958)

Recessional Hymn: A mighty fortress is our God (Ein feste burg)

Closing Voluntary: Final, by Gaston Litaize (1909-1991)

 

Tonight’s celebration of Choral Evensong begins with a pre-service recital by Charm City Baroque, featuring St. David’s soprano Kerry Holahan as soloist in psalm settings of Mondonville and Arne’s comedic cantata Lover’s Recantation. This mixture of French and English music continues in the service proper, which features the Kings College composer Orlando Gibbons and the boisterous and chromatically-charged Final by Gaston Litaize. Rheinberger’s Abendlied offers a contemplative centerpiece in a Romantic vein, offering a prayer that aptly sums up Evensong (the title literally translates as “evening-song”) as we begin the cycle of monthly evening services for the program year:

 

Bleib bei uns, denn es will Abend werden, und der Tag hat sich geneiget.

“Bide with us, for evening shadows darken, and the day will soon be over.”

~ Sunday, September 13 ~

St. David’s Day (Transferred) and Homecoming Sunday

The Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 19)

Opening Voluntary: Allegro, from Concerto en C Major for Two Trumpets, by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

Processional Hymn: Love divine, all loves excelling (Hyfrydol)

Song of Praise: “Glory to God in the highest (William Mathias, 1934-1992)

Psalm: Psalm 116, v. 1-8, setting by William Crotch (1775-1847)

Offertory Anthem: Let all the Peoples Praise Thee, O God, by William Mathias

Offertory Hymn: Christ for the World, we sing (Moscow)

Sanctus: “Holy, holy, holy” (William Mathias)

Communion Anthem: Tantum Ergo, by Sydney Nicholson (1875-1947)

Communion Hymn: Come down, O love divine (Down Ampney)

Recessional Hymn: God of grace, and God of glory (Cwm Rhondda)

Closing Voluntary: Toccata: St. David’s Day, by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

 

At St. David’s, the first Sunday of the program year is a time of celebration, welcoming back members, programs, and musicians as we join together in song. This Homecoming Sunday is also a celebration of St. David of Wales, the patron saint of the church; thus, this service is filled with music suffused with the essence of the Welsh downs and vales. The service features some of the most beloved Welsh hymn tunes—like Hyfrydol and Cwm Rhondda—with descants written especially for the service by organist and choirmaster, Dr. Douglas Buchanan. We also hear a number of works by Vaughan Williams, who, though not Welsh, certainly captures its pastoral atmosphere and rustic verve in Down Ampney and his toccata, St. David’s Day.

 

The service music and offertory anthem features compositions by William Mathias, one of the most often performed and sung Welsh composers of the 20th century. His anthem Let the People Praise Thee, O God was written for the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Princess Diana. It is redolent of Mathias’ characteristic verve, featuring a ritornello—a section of music that frequently returns—that sets the work’s title text. Following this ritornello are perambulations based around modal harmonies, with frequent chromatic jolts that keep the texture percolating. Mathias’ harmonic language is filled with diatonic clusters—tightly packed notes, as one hears in pressing down adjacent keys at the piano. Writing these for English countertenors, such clusters would shine brightly in the expansive cathedrals, and our choir members make them shine in St. David’s Roland Park as well.

 

Sydney Nicholson’s communion motet Tantum Ergo balances the energy of the offertory anthem with a contemplative spinning-out of chant lines, meditating on the mystery of communion. Lightly accompanied on organ, the work effervesces, lifting up and out, many of the melodic gestures pointing prayerfully upwards.


In the service this week we are joined by trumpeters Christopher Shiley and Brandon Cave, who are featured in the Opening Voluntary by Antonio Vivaldi, and throughout the service on hymns and service music. You can hear selections from last year's St. David's Day service on SoundCloud.

 

 

* * *              * * *              * * *

 

Repertoire for the 2015-2016 Season

 

Please note that this repertoire was presented during the 2015-2016 season for planning purposes only.

On occasion repertoire changed due to requirements of the liturgy, extreme weather,

and change in availability of performers in case of absence or illness.

 

September 13 – St. David’s Day, transferred

Voluntary: Allegro, from Concerto en C Major for two trumpets, by Antonio Vivaldi

Offertory Anthem: Let the People Praise Thee, O God, by William Mathias

Communion Anthem: Tantum Ergo, by Sydney Nicholson

Voluntary: St. David’s Day, by Ralph Vaughan Williams

 

September 20 – Proper 20

Voluntary: Cantabile, by Joseph Jongen

Offertory Anthem: Rejoice, in the Lord Alway, by Anonymous (16th c.)

Communion Anthem: Verily, Verily Say I Unto You, by Thomas Tallis

Voluntary: Fanfare, by Virgil Thomson

 

September 20 – Evensong

Preces & Responses: William Smith, in G

Canticles: Short Service, by Orlando Gibbons

Anthem: Abendlied, Rhineberger

Voluntary: Final, by Gaston Litaize

 

September 27 – Proper 21

Voluntary: Allegro – Presto, from Toccata by Alessandro Scarlati

Offertory Anthem: Die Himmel Erzahlen (Psalm 19), by Heinrich Schütz

Communion Anthem: O Salutaris Hostia, by Edward Elgar

Voluntary: Allegro (Fuga) from Toccata, by Alessandro Scarlatti

 

October 4 – Proper 22 - The Chorister Choir

Voluntary: Let all things now living, by David Cherwein

Offertory Anthem: Choristers: For the Beauty of the Earth, arr. Douglas Buchanan, sung by the Chorister Choir

Communion Anthem: Quartet: For the Beauty of the Earth, by John Rutter

Voluntary: Toccata and Fugue in F, by Dietrich Buxtehude

 

October 11 – Proper 23

Voluntary: Carillon de Chateau-Thierry, by Seth Bingham

Offertory Anthem: Teach me, O Lord, by William Byrd

Communion Anthem: Give almes of thy goods, by Christopher Tye

Voluntary: Carillon, by Edward Elgar

 

October 18 – Proper 24

Voluntary: Sheep may safely graze, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: "But as for his people," from Israel in Egypt, Handel

Communion Anthem: O Sacrum Convivum, by M.A. Charpentier

Voluntary: Arrival of the Queen of Sheba, by G.F. Handel

 

October 18 – Evensong

Preces & Responses: Herbert Sumson in D

Canticles: Evening Service in G, by Charles Villiers Stanford

Anthem: Cantique de Jean Racine, by Gabrielle Fauré

Voluntary: Thema mit variaties, by Hendrik Andriessen

 

October 25 – Proper 25

Voluntary: "Menuet gothique," from Suite Gothique,

Offertory Anthem: Almighty and Everlasting God, by Orlando Gibbons

Communion Anthem: Exsultati Justi, by Ludovico Viadana

Voluntary: Intrada, by Jean Sibelius

 

November 1 – Proper 26 (All Saints); Baptism

Voluntary: Psalm-Prelude No. 2, from Set 2 (Yea, there is no darkness with thee)

Offertory Anthem: And I Saw A New Heaven, by Edgar Bainton

Communion Anthem: Justorum Animae, by William Byrd

Voluntary: Carillon de Westminster, by Louis Vierne

 

November 8 – Proper 27; Ingathering

Voluntary: "Prière à Notre-Dame," from Suite Gothique

Offertory Anthem: Gloria, from Mass in D Major, by W.A. Mozart

Communion Anthem: Agnus Dei, from Mass in D Major, by W.A. Mozart

Voluntary: "Toccata," from Suite Gothique

 

November 15 – Proper 28 - The St. David's Singers

Voluntary: Andante sostenuto, from "Three Quiet Preludes," by Frederick Jacobi

Offertory Anthem: My Lord, What a Morning, arr. Douglas Buchanan

Voluntary: Toccata, by Eugene Gigout

 

November 22 – Proper 29 (Christ the King)

Voluntary: “Spitfire Prelude,” by William Walton

Offertory Anthem: Te Deum, by Gustav Holst

Communion Anthem: O Quam Amabilis Es, by Pierre Villet

Voluntary: Orb and Sceptre (Coronation March), by William Walton


November 22 – Evensong (Christ the King)

Preces & Responses: Richard Ayleward

Canticles: "Gloucester Service," by Herbert Howells

Anthem: Te Deum, by Gustav Holst

Voluntary: Paean, by Herbert Howells

 

November 29 – Advent 1

Voluntary: Nun komm, der heiden heiland, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: O thou, the central orb, by Charles Wood

Communion Anthem: Rorate coeli by Josef Rheinberger

Voluntary: Nun komm, der heiden heiland, by J.P. Sweelinck

 

December 6 – Advent 2

Voluntary: Choral with 4 variations on Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele ("Comfort, Comfort ye my

people"), by Johann Pachelbel

Offertory Anthem: Benedictus, by Charles Villiers Stanford

Communion Anthem: Fuit homo missus a Deo, by G.P. da Palestrina

Voluntary: On Jordan’s Bank, Aaron David Miller

 

December 13 – Advent 3

Voluntary: "Canticle," from Folkloric Suite, by Jean Langlais

Offertory Anthem: "And he shall purify," from Messiah, by G.F. Händel

Communion Anthem: Surge Illuminare, by William Byrd

Voluntary: "Canzona," from Folkloric Suite, by Jean Langlais

 

December 20 – Advent 4 (Lessons & Carols)

Voluntary: “The World Awaiting a Savior,” from Symphonie-Passion, by Marcel Dupre

Introit: Advent Matin Responsory, by G.P. Palestrina

Invitatory Hymn: Savior of the Nations Come, harmonized by Douglas Buchanan

Carol: Adam Lay yBounden, by Boris Ord

Carol: How lovely are the messengers, by Felix Mendelssohn

Carol: Bogoroditsye Dyevo, by Arvo Pärt

Carol: Rorate coeli desuper, by Josef Rheinberger

Offertory Anthem: Resonet in laudibus, by Douglas Buchanan

Communion Anthem: "Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her," from Magnificat, by J.S. Bach

Voluntary: Toccata on “Veni, veni,” by Adolphus Hailstork

 

December 24 – Christmas Eve

Voluntary: "Nativitie," from Symphony – Passion, by Marcel Dupré

Off. Anthem: Hodie a 8, by G.P. da Palestrina

Comm. Anthem: Blessed be that Maid Mairie, Douglas Buchanan

Voluntary: Final, from Symphony no. 1 in D Major, by Louis Vierne

 

(Choral hiatus for the two weeks following Christmas Day)

 

January 10 - Epiphany 1

Voluntary: Hymn to the Stars, by Sigfrid Karg-Elert

Offertory Anthem: What cheer!, Walton

Communion Anthem: Tantum Ergo, by Sydney Nicholson

Voluntary: Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam, by J.S. Bach

 

Janury 17 - Epiphany 2

Voluntary: Petit Prelude, by Joseph Jongen

Offertory Anthem: Wade in the Water, arr. by Douglas Bcuhanan

Communion Anthem: Soon and Very Soon, Traditional

Voluntary: Marches Nuptual, by Louis Vierne

 

January 17 - Evensong in Celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Preces & Responses: Tariq Al-Sabir (World Premiere

Canticles: 2nd Service, by William Byrd

Anthem: Selection from Rise, by Judah Adashi

Voluntary: Improvisation

 

January 24 - Epiphany 3 - Annual meeting - The St. David's Singers

Voluntary: Prelude in C, BWV 531, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: With a Voice of Singing

Voluntary: Fugue in C, BWV 531

 

January 31 - Epiphany 4

Voluntary: Toccata, by Johann Jakob Froberger

Offertory Anthem: "Israel hoffe auf den Herrn," Coro III from BWV 131

Communion Anthem: O Sacrum Convivium, by Luca Marenzio

Voluntary: Ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la, by William Byrd

 

February 7 - Last Epiphany (Transfiguration)

Voluntary: Alle Menschen müssen sterben, by Johann Pachelbel

Offertory Anthem: Cantique de Jean Racine, by Gabriel Fauré

Communion Anthem: Lead me Lord, by S.S. Wesley

Voluntary: Fughetta on Alle Menschen, by Douglas Buchanan

 

February 10 - Ash Wednesday

Offertory Anthem: Ave, Verum Corpus, by William Byrd

Communion Anthem: Lord, make me to know thy ways, by William Byrd

Voluntary: Pavane, by William Byrd

 

February 14 - Lent 1 - The Chorister Choir

Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott vater in Ewigkeit, manualiter, J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: Jesus walked this lonesome valley, arr. Douglas Buchanan

Communion Anthem: Quartet: Let thy merciful ears, O Lord, by Thomas Mudd

Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott vater in Ewigkeit, pedaliter, J.S. Bach

 

February 21 - Lent 2

Voluntary: Christe, aller Welt Trost, manualiter, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: "Ich harre des Herrn," Coro II from BWV 131, by J.S. Bach

Communion Anthem: Hear my prayer, O Lord, by Henry Purcell

Voluntary: Christe, aller Welt Trost, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach

 

February 21 Evensong

Preces & Responses: John Reading

Canticles: Evening Service in G Minor, by Henry Purcell

Anthem: Hear my prayer, O Lord, by Henry Purcell

Voluntary: Pange Lingua, by Virgil Thompson

 

February 28 - Lent 3

Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, manualiter, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: Bow thine ear, O Lord, by William Byrd

Communion Anthem: "And the Children of Israel sigh’d," from Israel in Egypt by G.F. Handel

Voluntary: Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach

 

March 6 - Lent 4

Voluntary: Aus tiefer Noth, manualiter, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: Aus der tiefe, Coro I from BWV 131

Communion Anthem: Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts, by Henry Purcell

Voluntary: Aus tiefer Noth, pedaliter, by J.S. Bach

 

March 13 - Lent 5

Voluntary: Prelude in B Minor, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: Let nothing ever grieve thee ("Lass dich nur nichts nicht dauren"), by Johannes Brahms

Communion Anthem: Let thy merciful ears, by Thomas Mudd

Voluntary: Fugue in B Minor, by J.S. Bach

 

March 20 - Palm/Passion Sunday

Offertory Anthem: Hear my prayer, O Lord, by Felix Mendelssohn

Communion Anthem: Timor et tremor, by Francis Poulenc

 

March 23 - Tenebrae

Chanted psalms for the Office of Tenebrae

 

March 24 - Maundy Thursday

Voluntary: "Meditation (Communion)," from Suite Medieval, by Jean Langlais

Offertory Anthem: Nolo mortem pecatoris, by Thomas Morley

Anthem at the Footwashing: Ubi Caritas, by Maurice Duruflé

Communion Anthem: Eram quasi agnus, Victoria

 

March 25 - Good Friday, Noon Service

St. John Passion, by Tomas Luis de Victoria

Veneration of the Cross, by Tomas Luis de Victoria

Offertory Anthem: God so Loved the World, by John Stainer

Communion Anthem: Adoramus te, by G. P. da Palestrina

 

March 26 - Easter Vigil

Offertory Anthem: Sing ye to the Lord, by Edward C. Bairstow

Communion Anthem: Sicut cervus, G.P. de Palestrina

Voluntary: "Resurrection," from Symphonie-Passion, by Marcel Dupré

 

March 27 - Easter Day (Two Choral Services, 9:00 and 11:00)

Voluntary: Andantino, from Symphony no. 5 in F,  by Charles-Marie Widor

Offertory Anthem: Ye Choirs of New Jerusalem, by Charles Villiers Stanford

Communion Anthem: Greater Love Hath No Man, by John Ireland

Voluntary: Toccata, from Symphonie no. 5, by Charles-Marie Widor

 

April 3 - Easter 2

Voluntary: Andante con tenerezza, no. II from "Three Quiet Preludes," by Frederick Jacobi

Offertory Anthem: Behold, O God our defender, by Herbert Howells

Communion Anthem: O Taste and See, by Ralph Vaughan Williams

Voluntary: Prelude, Fugue, and Chaconne in C, by Dietrich Buxtehude

 

April 10 - Easter 3

Voluntary: O filii et filiae, by Wilbur Held

Offertory Anthem: "Worthy is the Lamb that was Slain," from Messiah, G.F. Handel

Communion Anthem: Haec dies, by William Byrd

Voluntary: "Acclamations," from Suite Medieval by Jean Langlais

 

April 17 - Easter 4 (Good Shepherd) - The Chorister Choir

Voluntary: A Meditation on “Brother James’ Air,” by Harold Darke

Offertory Anthem: The Lord is my Shepherd, by Howard Goodall

Voluntary: Toccata in F,  by J.S. Bach

 

April 24 - Easter 5

Voluntary: Master Tallis’ Testament, by Herbert Howells

Offertory Anthem: Psalm 148, by Douglas Buchanan

Communion Anthem: A New Commandment giveth I Unto You, by Thomas Tallis

Voluntary: Felix Namque, by Thomas Tallis

 

May 1 - Easter 6

Voluntary: Andante cantabile, by Joseph Jongen

Offertory Anthem: My beloved spake, by Patrick Hadley

Communion Anthem: "Oh for the wings of a dove," from Hear my Prayer, by Felix Mendelssohn

Voluntary: Piece pour grande orgue, by Joseph Jongen

 

May 8 - Easter 7 (Ascension)

Voluntary: Finzi’s Rest, by Herbert Howells

Offertory. Anthem: God Is Gone Up, by Gerald Finzi

Communion Anthem: O, Taste and See, by Jeffrey Martin

Voluntary: Ascension, by Douglas Buchanan

 

May 15 - Whitsunday/Pentecost - The St. David's Singers

Voluntary: Veni Sancte Spiritus, by Libby Larson

Offertory Anthem: Listen, Sweet Dove, by Grayston Ives

Voluntary: Fugue in D Major, by J.S. Bach

 

May 15 - Evensong

Preces & Responses: Kenneth Leighton in D

Canticles: Evening Service, by Douglas Buchanan

Anthem: Chichester Psalms, III, by Leonard Bernstein

Voluntary: Alleluias, by Simon Preston

 

May 22 - Trinity

Voluntary: Prelude in E-flat Major, by J.S. Bach

Offertory Anthem: I Saw The Lord, by John Stainer

Communion Anthem: O Lux Beata Trinitas, by Michael Praetorius

Voluntary: Fugue in E-flat Major, by J.S. Bach

 

May 29 - Corpus Christi

Voluntary: Elevation, by Alexander Guilmant

Offertory Anthem: Chichester Psalms, I, by Leonard Bernstein

Communion Anthem: Ave Verum Corpus, by W.A. Mozart

Voluntary: Lord, dismiss us with thy blessing, by Douglas Buchanan

 

 

 

 


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